email marketing

[350] How to use surveys to increase your online sales with Rob and Kennedy

Hypnotist Rob and mind reader Kennedy had successful stage careers before turning their attention to helping others build entertainment businesses through online courses/membership sites. 

When they started using surveys to find out what products/services their ideal clients wanted, they discovered something surprising. People were much more likely to buy their products/services if they were offered immediately after taking a survey.

They also learned that using surveys to segment their audience i.e. sorting them into groups according to what they needed help with - and offering different products/services to each group - could boost sales even further. 

Now surveys are an integral part of Rob and Kennedy's marketing strategy. So much so they’ve developed an online tool called Response Suite that can help you use surveys to increase your sales.

In this episode they talk about how you can surveys to boost your online sales (even if you don't have access to fancypants tools).

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes including all the links mentioned in this episode}

Why use surveys in your marketing

Most companies are marketing to their prospective customers in the same way. You sign up to their email list, then they make you a series of offers - which means many of us just switch off.

Using surveys in your marketing, not only allows you to bring more variety into your marketing, it allows you to segment your audience, according to their preferences. Which means you can make sure you are promoting the right products/services to the right customer.

In a time when most of us are consuming information on-demand, segmenting your audience is vital says Kennedy. “Look at Netflix, look at Amazon Prime, look at all these different products. The way we consume information right now is on our schedule. I think of it like if one of those choose your own adventure stories...well that's how all our marketing should be.”

“The minute you've got more than one person in your audience, you can no longer speak to everyone in the same way anymore, " adds Rob. "When you've got more than one person on your [email] list, you now have vastly different people, with vastly different experiences, with vastly different pain points who need to be spoken to in different ways.”

Surveys also work on psychological level. When someone has just done you a favour (i.e. completed your short survey), they will feel a powerful need to follow through with what they’ve committed to, says Kennedy. Which is why they’re far more likely to buy from you.

To learn more about this Kennedy recommends reading Robert Cialdini’s book Influence.

How to use surveys in your marketing

A survey can be as simple as asking a question, where you give a choice of specific answers and use what you learn to direct your prospective customers towards particular products/services.

Using a survey building tool like Survey Monkey can make things easier. But even with a tool like this, responses generally need to be tracked and followed up manually, which can be time consuming.

This is exactly what led Rob and Kennedy to create Response Suite, which integrates with most email marketing software (e.g. Mailchimp, Active Campaign and Infusionsoft) and allows you to automate the process.

For example, you might create a three question survey that leads to three different products/services. Once someone has completed the survey, they are immediately directed to a landing page (a dedicated web page where the user can only take one single action) about a specific product/service that provides a solution to a problem they highlighted in their survey responses.

You don’t even necessarily need to have three different products/services. You might simply want to talk about your product/service in a different way and/or give a different message, depending on the needs of a particular group of people.

For example, my Build Your Audience programme is suitable for beginners (those who are just starting to build their online audience on social media) up to more advanced students who want to build their audience through email marketing.

Using surveys not only helps me understand where my prospective customers are in their journey. It also means I can create different landing pages, with a slightly different message, that resonate with prospective clients at different stages of that journey. And when people can say ‘this is for me!’ they’re far more likely to buy.

Tips for creating great surveys

  • Ask closed questions with a number of specific answers (maximum four)
  • Only ask questions that relate to products/services you actually offer
  • Don’t ask too many questions (3-5 really questions can be more than enough)
  • Be clear on why you’re doing the survey and your desired outcome
  • Create conversations - not dead ends 

Shownotes

Response Suite Trial Offer 

Build Your Audience Programme

Rev.com*

Kapwing

Social Media Video Engagement Playbook 

Social Media Engagement Playbook

LinkedIn Content Strategy Playbook

Build Your Audience Live Event

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn

 

 

[342] How to build your audience on YouTube with Jessica Dante

YouTube is the second largest search engine after Google. So if you want to get in front of a large audience, having a Youtube channel can be a smart move.

But if you’re not familiar with the platform, the practicalities of setting up a channel, deciding what kind of content you should be creating and getting people to actually watch it can feel daunting.

In this podcast episode, I talk to Love and London founder and successful YouTuber Jessica Dante. She shares her tips on getting started with a YouTube channel, finding your niche (and why you need one), growing your YouTube audience and how to overcome your fear of publishing less than perfect video.

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes including all the links mentioned in this episode}.

What kind of content should you publish on YouTube

When Jess started her YouTube channel in 2015 she knew she wanted it to be based around travel but was reluctant to niche down too soon. Initially, she focused on general travel tips and guides to interesting European cities, but quickly learned her focus was too broad. As Jess says: “If you try and talk to everyone you’re talking to no one.”

After a few months of consistently uploading videos each week, Jess noticed that the videos which focused specifically on London were outperforming others and that YouTube had started to recommend them to viewers.  She decided to niche her content down, focusing solely on London - and that’s when her channel really started to take off.

If you’re new to YouTube, it’s unlikely you’ll hit the spot with your content straight away, says Jess. Most new YouTubers have to experiment with different topics until they find their style and niche.

Even if you’re just working out your niche, the one thing you can get right straight away, is the type of content you create - content that solves viewers’ problems. For Jess, this was about helping people find interesting things to do in London (and find their way around). For you, it must also be about solving your ideal clients’ problems.

Once your channel is more established, you can start to create content that is specifically about your products/services, but initially your focus should be on helping your audience, says Jess. This will help you develop authority and credibility - vital for building your Youtube audience.

How long should your YouTube videos be?

Although there are no hard and fast rules, if you’re new to Youtube, Jess recommends keeping your videos at around three to five minutes, although longer videos work well for certain types of video such as tutorials.

How often?

When you’re starting out on YouTube, Jess recommends posting a new video each week. This will help you develop a consistent publishing schedule and boost the YouTube algorithm in your favour.

How to set up your channel correctly

Jess believes the most important thing when you’re getting started on YouTube is to focus on your video titles and thumbnail images – the small preview image of your video - as this is how people decide whether or not to watch your video.

Although YouTube automatically generates a thumbnail image for you, Jess suggests creating and uploading a custom thumbnail using a design tool like Canva.

“Use a picture you’ve taken especially for the thumbnail, for example if the video is you talking to the camera then get a picture of yourself doing that and then on Canva add two to three words to the side that will complement what the title is, not a duplicate of the title,” she says.

The video description is also important.  Jess recommends including the keyword for the video in the first 25 characters and give plenty of detail (one or two paragraphs is ideal) which should sell the video and tell people why they should watch it to the end. This should be followed with some general information about you and your business and add some links to your website or to resources you mention in the video.

How important is video quality on YouTube?

When you’re just starting out, don’t worry too much about equipment or quality (although good audio is important), says Jess. She points out that one of her most popular videos - made in the early days of her Youtube channel - is poor quality. Focus instead on adding value for viewers.

Janet agrees. She often searches for piano tutorials on YouTube and finds the quality of the video isn’t important to her: “It’s more about what’s accessible and which has the most value. It shouldn’t be style over substance”

For video editing, Jess recommends  iMovie for Mac users or Windows Movie Maker for Microsoft. For the first two years Jess did all her own editing and suggests keeping it simple, “People are interested in the information not the fancy transitions,” she says.

How to keep people watching your videos to the end (and why it’s important)

If you want people to keep watching, it’s important to keep the introduction in your videos short. Jess recommends aiming for five seconds, but definitely less than 15. She usually prepares three sentences for her introduction: one to introduce the topic of the video, one to introduce her and one to tell viewers about the lead magnet she’ll be giving away at the end.

Offering something of value at the end of each video can be a good way to encourage people to watch to the end of your video.  For example, Jess offers a lead magnet – a resource or information product you create with the purpose of encouraging your ideal customers/clients to sign up to your email list - at the end of many of her videos. She tells people about the lead magnet at the beginning of her video to encourage viewers to watch to the end.

Jess has also started adding outtakes/bloopers in at the end too to give viewers an extra reason to watch to the very end.

Which numbers to track on YouTube

When you’re new to YouTube, it’s easy to get obsessed with viewer numbers. While this important (the more people view your videos, the more people YouTube will show your videos to). But other key metrics are equally - if not more - important.

YouTube’s ‘watch time’ is a measure of how many minutes people spend watching your channel and give a good indication of how engaged viewers are when watching your videos. YouTube also tracks your retention rate – the percentage of your video that viewers watched.

Jess explains: “The higher retention the better, but when you’re starting aim for at least 50% and then work up to at least 60% and 70%. Nobody ever gets 100%, it’s just not possible.”

How to keep viewers on your YouTube channel (and why you need to)

YouTube is not just tracking how long people watch your videos for, it’s also looking at how long people spend on your channel. And the more time people spend on your channel, the more people will be shown your content.

That’s why it can be a good idea to use YouTube cards – interactive ‘panels’ that slide in and out when a video is playing – are a great way to encourage viewers to watch more videos on your channel, and therefore increase your watch time. Creating playlists of videos on similar topics and using cards to direct people to related content can be a great way to do this. In fact, planning your content in clusters i.e. creating five or six videos on a similar topic is a strategic way to build playlists as you go.

When using cards, Jess recommends you mention when they appear and point to the corner of the frame where the card shows. She also uses cards to send people to landing pages (dedicated web pages with a single call to action) for her lead magnets, as she believes they help create a better experience for viewers too.

How to use keywords to help your videos get found in search

If you want your videos to get found on YouTube, you need to use the words/phrases your ideal viewers are searching for.

Ideally you want to use terms that people are searching for, but not one that is so popular that your post will get lost in the noise of the competition.

Narrowing things down can help with this. For example, the phrase ‘how to write a press release’ is a very popular search term. Using a less popular, but more specific phrase like ‘How to write a press release for your small business’ or ‘How to write a press release for a charity’ (generally referred to as ‘longtail’ keywords)  is likely to be more effective when it comes to Google rankings.

If you’re not sure how to make your topic more specific, using YouTube's autocomplete function can help, says Jess.  For example, if she is thinking about creating a video on how to use an Oyster card in London, using the autocomplete function  might show that some people are searching for, ‘How to use an Oyster Card in London with kids’. This is a much more niche term, which means it’s likely to perform better in search.

How important are comments on your YouTube videos?

Comments are a signal to YouTube that people are enjoying your videos and that people are engaging with you and your content.

“When you’re just starting out, check your comments on videos every single day. Get into a conversation with these people as they are your early adopters. Treat them like VIPs and ask what other content they want to see from you,” says Jess.

How long does it take to grow an audience for your YouTube channel?

Building an audience on YouTube is a long term game and Jess advises new users not to expect anything major in the first year. After your first six months, you can do a thorough evaluation and make tweaks where necessary.

Janet uses Beth Campagna from Mama Life London who started her channel in 2018 as an example. Some videos only have 200 views but Janet has bought Beth’s products because she liked what she was doing on YouTube. “It’s a mistake to think you can’t make sales or get clients if you’re not getting massive views. You can make an impact with a smaller audience,” she says.

How building an email list helps to grow your YouTube audience

Jess thinks it’s important to consider how you’re going to send people to your YouTube content.

It’s also important to promote your YouTube content on social media but bear in mind that it’s not always as effective to ask people to move from one channel to another. For example, people are often reluctant to move from Instagram to YouTube but, if you can get people off their current platform to YouTube, YouTube will promote your content and recommend it to viewers watching content on similar topics.

Jess also uses email to promote her YouTube videos and stresses the importance of doing this within the first 24 hours of publishing a new video.  Not only will your videos get more views as your email subscribers start watching, but YouTube will register that people are watching your videos and start recommending them to more people,” she says.

The YouTube algorithm looks at how well videos perform in the first 24 hours. It takes into account the first seven days too, but the first 24 hours are crucial.

Jess’s biggest piece of advice for building an audience on YouTube is to focus on building an email list. When she started her YouTube channel she wasn’t building a list and on her first 25 videos there was no offer of a lead magnet.

The first video she promoted a lead magnet in performed really well and she found she’d got 35 subscribers overnight. She suggests having at least one lead magnet from the very start to help you build your email list.

Janet is also a strong advocate of building an email list. Although it takes time, she tells her clients to celebrate every single person who joins the list. It takes time and a lot of experimentation to learn the best strategies for getting people onto your email list - and keeping them there - which is why it’s important to remember that it’s a long term game.

Jess agrees it takes time, and believes there’s too much focus on big numbers: “You might only need 100 people on your email list or one person to see your video to generate money.”

Podcast show notes:

  • Jess’ business story (10:02)
  • How testing different content can help you work out what your niche is (and why you should stick to it) (13:30)
  • How to get started with growing your YouTube audience (19:55)
  • How to use keywords to make your videos rank higher (22:05)
  • The different types of content you can create on Youtube (27:02)
  • How to get your first videos on Youtube seen and searched for (31:05)
  • How to write an effective description (34:40)
  • What is ‘watch time’ and how you can improve this data (35:40)
  • Why your videos don’t have to be professionally recorded to succeed (43:10)
  • How to use ‘cards’ on Youtube and how it will help your videos rank higher (45:40)
  • How Jess has grown her Youtube channel (50:38)
  • How long it takes to grow your Youtube channel (53:30)
  • Why you need to trial and test different lead magnets (55:30)
  • How regularly you should be posting content on your Youtube channel (1:04:50)
  • How to edit your videos if you’re a beginner (1:05:06)

Resources

Jess’ Website: Love and London

Love and London on Youtube

Love and London on LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter

Canva

PicMonkey

Leadpages (Affiliate Link)

Andrew and Pete

iMovie

Windows Movie Maker

Episode 241: How to build your email list via a Youtube channel

Purchase the ‘How to create coaching packages’ masterclass here

Join the waitlist for the Build Your Audience Programme here

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Join the priority wait list for Build Your Audience Live Event here

Apply for a place on the LinkedIn Content Strategy Masterclass here

Get your hands on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course now

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn

[339] How to build an audience for an online course or membership

If you’ve already tried to create your own course or membership programme you’ll know that it’s not a simple case of ‘build it and they will come’.

In this episode, I share the reasons why you must build an audience before you launch an online course or membership site. I also break down the steps you need to take to build your online audience.

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes including all the links mentioned in this episode.}

Why online courses/memberships are attractive

If you’re desperate to break free from feast and famine in your business and secure recurring income, creating an online course or membership can seem like an attractive prospect.

Selling online courses or running a membership site can help you serve your clients in a more flexible way - allowing you to cut down on travel time, spend more time with your family and achieve a better work/life balance.

Before you dive in, though - a quick reality check. If you’re looking for a ‘get rich quick’ scheme, this isn’t it. Overnight success stories are few and far between.

Why online courses/memberships are challenging

If you’re interested in launching an online course or membership, you may be attracted by the idea of generating passive income. But in my experience there’s no such thing as passive income.

As someone put it to me recently: ‘If you build a farm, you have to keep feeding the animals’. While there may have been a better way to phrase it (I certainly don’t see my clients as animals!) there is a lot of truth in what she said. You can’t build an online course or membership and then leave it to run itself. The odd technical issue is bound to crop up from time to time and of course you’ll constantly be thinking of ways to update and refresh the content.

The other thing you must consider is your audience. It doesn’t matter that you’re an expert in your field or that you have amazing content; if you don’t have an audience, come launch day, you won’t make any sales.

Why you shouldn’t create your online course before you’ve built an audience

Creating an online course or membership community is exciting – I’ve spoken to many clients who’ve been itching to jump right in – but I always advise them to take things slowly. There are a few key things to consider before getting started.

Firstly, you need to think about your audience. How big is your audience and where do they hang out online? People generally aren’t on social media to buy. So while you might be able to nudge people over the fence via a Facebook ad or social media post, most sales will take place in your inbox.

So if you have a huge social media following but only a handful of people on your email list, you might need a rethink. The average online conversion rate sits at about 1-2% which means for every hundred people on your list only a handful will buy. Which is why you need a much bigger audience than you think.

When it comes to building an audience, though, it’s not just a numbers game. If people are going to buy from you – particularly if they’re spending a few hundred pounds or more – they need to know, like and trust you first and that takes time. I know from analysing my own sales figures that typically it takes people around seven or eight touch points before they decide to buy, whether that’s downloading your worksheets, reading your blog, receiving your newsletter or interacting with you on social media.

Another thing to consider before creating an online course is what your audience actually wants or needs from you. You may have a fixed idea of what you want to deliver or what interests you, but I’ve lost count of the times that I’ve spoken to business owners who’ve spent time and money creating an online course only to discover later that it isn’t what their customers are actually looking for.

Step 1: Work out the size of audience you need

The first step in creating your online course or membership programme is to work out how big your audience needs to be i.e. how many people you need on your email list to hit your sales targets.

Next, work out a rough idea of the course or membership you want to create, how much you’ll need to charge, and how many you want to sell. If you’ve decided you’re going to sell a high-end membership programme, costing several thousand pounds, you may only need a few thousand on your email list. But if you’re selling a course at a lower price point, you’ll need to shoot for 10k or beyond.

To help you work out your numbers, I’ve created a handy tool for you.

My audience calculator will help you work out how many people you need in your audience to hit your sales targets.

 

Step 2: Build your audience on social media

I used to tell people that they should be building an audience on social media, on their blog, and through their email marketing simultaneously. What I’ve come to realise, though, is that if you haven’t nailed your social media content, you’ll struggle to build your audience on your other platforms. It’s only through creating content and engaging with people on social media that you really come to understand your customers’ problems – and how to solve them.

Once you’ve figured out what works for your audience on social media you can transfer this knowledge and start creating the right kind of content across your blog and email marketing (which is where you’re more likely to make sales) and encourage your followers to join your email list.

The first step in building an audience on social media is to learn where your potential customers are hanging out. So if they love Instagram, that’s where you need to be. If they’re all using LinkedIn, it doesn’t matter if you hate it – wherever your target audience spends their time is where you need to spend yours.

Initially I’d recommend that you choose just one or two social media platforms and experiment with different types of content until you see what resonates with people. Once you’ve mastered that, you can tweak your content a little to make it work for the other platforms your audience uses. Consider getting involved with Facebook groups or Twitter chats, whether starting your own or joining in with established groups. This is a great way to find out about things your ideal customers are struggling with so you can start creating content that will help them.

For more information on creating engaging social media content, check out Three Types of Social Media Content to Guarantee you Sales Today episode.

Step 3: Build your audience on a blog

Once you’ve built up a following on social media, you can start growing your audience through content.

Having a social media following is vital, but doing so exclusively is a bad idea, as you’re essentially building your audience on someone else’s land. Just last week there was widespread panic with an unexpected Facebook and Instagram outage.  Many business owners were desperately trying to launch programmes and products to their followers but weren’t able to post anything until the outage was resolved.

Publishing content on your own website in the form of a blog, podcast or embedded video puts you back in control of how you connect with your audience. It’s where you move people from the borrowed land of social media onto your own land.

Not only that, publishing regular content on a blog can help you attract more traffic to your website, improve your chances of being found in Google search, help you build your email list.  It’s also a valuable way of getting people to know, like and trust you. I remember one of my customers, dog photographer Kerry Jordan, telling me that she booked a ticket for one of my live events last year because, after listening to my podcast regularly, she felt like she already knew me and could trust me to deliver what I promise.

My advice is to choose one main form of content whether that’s a blog, a podcast or a YouTube channel, and spend time getting comfortable with the format. If you’ve taken the steps above to improve your engagement on your social media channels and taken the time to learn what your ideal customers are interested in, you should have a good idea of what kind of content to focus on in your blog or podcast.

To give you an example, if you were interested in creating content about audience building, as I’m doing here, you’d find lots of people searching online for information on how to pick blog topics, how to build a following on social media, how to know what to blog about, how often to blog or how to convert blog readers. Because I can see that these are all issues my ideal customers are struggling with, I know that they’ll make great blog topics.

Once you have a broad range of topics, do some keyword research to make sure you’re using the keywords and phrases that people are actually using to find that content in Google.

And don’t forget the final step: promotion. This is another reason why it’s vital to build up your social media following first; that way you’ll have an audience of people to share your blog/vlog or podcast with (albeit small at first).

For ideas on blog topics check out How to Make Sales from your Business Blog.

Step 4: Build your audience through email marketing

If you have a sizeable email list, you have instant access to hundreds or thousands of your ideal customers who likely already know, like and trust you. With an email list of 15,000 subscribers, I know that if I needed to generate cash, I could create a course in a weekend and make sales immediately. That’s the power of email marketing.

So how do you get people to sign up to your email list? Our inboxes are already full of emails we’ll never get round to reading, so the last thing most people want is to sign up for yet another newsletter, unless there’s something really juicy in it for them. Creating a  lead magnet - an information product e.g. checklist, a template sheet or a how-to guide that helps solve your ideal clients’ problems - is the most effective way to do this.

Once you’ve created your lead magnet(s), it’s time to turn, once again, to that strong social media following you’ve built up. Promote the hell out of it, on every platform you use, to get those new subscribers rolling in.

And don’t hit the brakes once they’ve subscribed – getting the actual sign up is just the starting point in your relationship. Asking for a sale at this stage would be like proposing to someone who’s only just agreed to go on a date with you. To move the relationship further along, I like to use an email nurture sequence, which sounds fancy but is actually just a way of describing a series of emails that contain useful content new subscribers should find helpful. These emails will be spaced out over maybe 3-5 days, or even weeks depending on the nature of the lead magnet, and will gradually build up that like, know and trust factor.

Find out How to Create a High-converting Lead Magnet here.

Step 5: Beta testing.

I’m including this as step five but don’t feel like you have to wait until you’ve reached your audience goal before you do a test run. When you’re at a point where you have a big enough audience to get even ten people onboard, offering a beta version of your course or programme can be a great move. I don’t recommend giving your course away for free because people are far more likely to do the work if they’ve invested in it but you can offer a significant discount to a select few in exchange for their feedback as they work through the materials. I don’t even think you need to wait until you’ve created the full course before you run a beta test. Creating your materials week-by-week, tweaking as you go based on the feedback from your beta testers can be really effective.

I recently launched a beta test group for my upcoming Build your Audience course and discovered that the material I had put together was actually far too challenging. Because I was working with a small group and could give everyone a lot of individual help and attention it worked out fine, but it did show me where I’m going to have to make changes before the official launch to make sure I’m providing maximum value to the people who sign up.

Step 6: Do a pre-launch

As with the beta testing phase, the pre-launch doesn’t have to wait until right before your official launch date; it’s definitely something you want to be thinking about while you work on building your audience. Be open about the fact you’re building a course and get your audience involved in the process. Show them what you’re working on and ask for feedback. Get them to co-create the course with you.  When I do that I find, not only do I get great feedback that I can use to shape my course content, but my audience becomes really invested in what I’m creating, often asking where they can sign up long before I’m even ready to open up the sales.

Episode 237, How to Launch a Membership Site with Anissa Holmes is really useful.  Anissa started her membership site with almost no content and basically asked her audience, ‘what do you want to know?’, ‘what do you want to learn?’ which showed her exactly how to create relevant resources for the people she wanted to help.

When you’re thinking of creating a membership programme or online course, I think the two key things to consider are flexibility and patience. Unless you already have a sizeable, engaged email list, expect the whole process to take a year or so and be flexible about absolutely everything, from your expected timescale to the actual content and delivery of the course itself. Be prepared to experiment and let your audience lead you where they need you to go.

Podcast show notes:

  • Why online courses and membership are an attractive source of income (but not as easy as it may seem) (2:35)
  • Why you need to build an audience before launching a course or membership (10:30)
  • How many people you need in your audience to reach your sales targets (17:32)
  • How to build your audience on social media (19:08)
  • How to build your audience through producing content (26:04)
  • How to build your audience through email marketing (38:05)
  • Why you should test your course/membership content before you create it (45:40)

Resources

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Episode 291: The truth about passive income

Keap (previously InfusionSoft)

Episode 325: Three social media posts that will help you generate sales today

Leadpages (Affiliate Link)

Episode 335: How to create a high converting lead magnet

Episode 333: 39 Surprisingly easy ways to increase your email subscribers

Episode 237: How to launch a membership site with Anissa Holmes

Join the priority wait list for Build Your Audience Live here

Apply for a place on the LinkedIn Content Strategy Masterclass here

Get your hands on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course now

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn

[335] How to create a high-converting lead magnet

If you want to attract leads and sales for your business, you need an email list. But in a time when most of us are overwhelmed with information, inviting people to sign up for your lead magnet is not enough.

In this episode, I break down the steps you need to take to create a successful lead magnet - from choosing a topic for your lead magnet to how to set up a sales funnel that converts into sales.

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes including all the links mentioned in this episode}.

What is a lead magnet?

A lead magnet is a resource or information product you create with the purpose of encouraging your ideal customers/clients to sign up to your email list.

There are so many different types of lead magnet you can create: quizzes, cheat sheets, checklists, challenges, free book chapters, whitepapers, video tutorials, templates - just to give you a few examples.

But when you’re just getting started, it really is best to keep it simple. In my online course, How To Create a High-Converting Lead Magnet, I recommend starting with a one or two page downloadable pdf.

What makes a great lead magnet?

A great lead magnet solves a specific type of problem for a specific type of customer/client, offers a quick win and (crucially) leads your subscribers towards a paid product/service.

One my highest converting lead magnets is my marketing checklist series, which set out the key activities you need to be doing to hit key income goals in your business - 1k, 2k, 5k and 10k a month. These solve a very specific problem for a very specific type of customer (a small business owner who is unsure what marketing activities they should be using to hit their income goals) and leads towards a very specific service - the Love Marketing Membership. The resources in the membership are built around those key checklists, so once people have downloaded them, joining the membership is the next logical step (the checklists list the activities you need to do to hit your income goals, the membership contains the resources you need to achieve them).

I’ve recently also launched an audience calculator which helps you calculate how many email list subscribers you need to reach your sales targets. Again, this solves a very specific problem for a very specific type of customer - small businesses who want to grow their email list but are unsure what kind of numbers they need to reach their goals. The ‘quick win’ is of course getting the audience number you need.

Lead magnets don’t necessarily have to be free. In fact, getting people to pay a small amount can mean you attract much more qualified leads - something I have been experimenting with recently.

Over the past five years I’ve created dozens of free ‘lead magnets’ - pdf guides, checklists, webinars, templates (just to give a few examples) and, most recently, an interactive audience calculator.

This has helped me grow my email list but here’s some interesting stats for you:

  • Only 30% of those who opted into my most popular lead magnet (my free marketing checklists) actually downloaded the materials in the 7 days after they became available.
  • Around 80% of those who bought my LinkedIn Content Strategy Playbook - priced at £9.99 - downloaded it in the first 24 hours.

Do lead magnets work for product-based businesses?

If you have a product-based business, you may think that offering discount codes is the only kind of ‘lead magnet’ you can create. This is simply not true.

In fact, voucher codes can be counterproductive, as they can encourage subscribers to join your list to get their discount code, then unsubscribe afterwards. Taking the time to create an information-led led magnet can actually be a much better way to build a relationship and encourage loyalty in your customers.

If you have a product-based business, the best kind of lead magnet usually involves teaching people how to use your product

For example, my 2019 Media Diary contains key dates and awareness days for every month of the year, which saves users hours of research - making it the next logical step for those who download my free media calendar. As soon as they download the calendar, they're offered the opportunity to buy the diary. If they don’t buy the diary on the first offer, they're reminded about it a number of times in the follow-up email sequence.

Here’s a few more examples of how it works in practice:

  • If you sell podcast microphones, you could create guide on how to create and publish your first podcast
  • If you sell wool, you could create a guide on how to get stains out of wool (one of my clients has done exactly that)
  • If you make candles, you could create a guide on how to make candles (sounds counterintuitive but some people will try to make their own, then realise it’s easier to buy yours)

The biggest mistake people make with lead magnets

The biggest mistake people make with lead magnets is making them too broad. But if you’re trying to appeal to everyone e.g. ‘5 tips for better self-care’ you’ll end up appealing to no one. Focusing on a specific self-care problem that affects a specific type of person is much more likely to appeal e.g. Ten ways to get a good night’s sleep with a newborn (yes it’s really possible).

I’ve listed some more examples for you below. The examples in the column on the left are too broad.

Creating your lead magnet

If you’re creating your first lead magnet, I recommend keeping it simple and sticking to a simple one or two page PDF.

Most coaches, consultants and entrepreneurs I know have something they teach their customers/clients every day which can be turned into a lead magnet in 30 minutes or less (there is a template for this in my How To Create A High-Converting Lead Magnet course).

It’s vital to have a really clear title that states exactly what problem your lead magnet will solve for your customer e.g. 39 easy ways to attract more email subscribers, how to write a press release for your small business, 29 unique gifts for coffee lovers. Your intro should explain how your lead magnet will solve that problem.

Why you need a landing page for your lead magnet

A landing page is a web page that has a single call-to-action e.g. ‘download my free gift guide for coffee lovers.’

Sending prospective email list subscribers to a page where they only do one thing (well, two really - opt into your lead magnet or not) means they can’t get distracted by other things e.g. sidebars, drop down menus, pop-ups etc. Which means they’re far more likely to join your list.

I use Leadpages to create landing pages for my lead magnets. You can choose from a range of templates (that can be customised with your own images, fonts and colours), and because the design has already been tested, you’ll be guaranteed a much higher conversion rate. Something as simple as changing the wording on your sign-up button e.g from ‘download my free guide’ to ‘get it now’ can have a big impact on your conversion. This is why it’s vital to keeping tweaking and testing your copy and images. Leadpages (which has a free trial) also allows you to split test different page designs/copy to see which convert better.

I’ve included a module on writing compelling copy for your landing page in my online course How To Create A High-Converting Lead Magnet.

How to create a nurture sequence

Once you’ve delivered your lead magnet, you need to start building a relationship with your new email subscriber. You do this by creating a nurture sequence - a series of emails that add further value and help you get to know your prospective customer. For a simple downloadable pdf, I recommend a series of five emails (there is a template for this in How To Create A High-Converting Lead Magnet).

While many new email subscribers won’t be ready to buy from you, some might. So don’t be afraid to make an offer in your nurture sequence.

Do make sure your practices are compliant with data protection law. You can find out more here in my podcast episode with Suzanne Dibble. They key things to know are: you mustn’t add people to your email list without their permission (given by choosing to tick a box - it must not be a pre-checked box) and it must be really clear what they’re signing up for.

How to promote your lead magnet

I wish I could tell you there was one thing you could do to get people to download your email lead magnet, but I can’t. The reality is, it’s a bit like throwing spaghetti at wall - you have to try lots of different thing to work out which will work best for you/your business.

However there are some strategies that work for most types of lead magnet/business.There is a list of ideas for promoting your lead magnet in 39 easy ways to grow your email subscribers. If I could give you one piece of advice, it would be this: get the link for your lead magnet everywhere your ideal customer/client is hanging out online. Everywhere.

Podcast show notes:

  • What is a lead magnet (3:50)
  • Examples of lead magnets that work for product based business (5:50)
  • Step 1 - understanding your customer’s pain point (9:40)
  • Why a paid lead magnet can have a higher rate of conversion (14:20)
  • Why your lead magnet needs to address a specific problem (18:40)
  • Step 2 - how to create a simple lead magnet (24:10)
  • How to get people to sign up to your lead magnet (34:10)
  • How to ensure your lead magnet converts into sales (37:22)
  • How to set up a sales funnel (42:18)

Resources

Register for the Lead Magnet Course here

Episode 333: 39 Surprisingly easy ways to increase your email subscribers

Leadpages (Affiliate Link)

Unbounce

MailChimp

InfusionSoft (now Keap)

Apply for a place on the LinkedIn Content Strategy Masterclass here

Get your hands on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course now

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn

[333] 39 Surprisingly easy ways to increase your email subscribers

In January 2019, I launched a new online course How To Write Awesome Sales Copy which generated £20k in sales. It was a fairly relaxed launch, based around my six-part launch sequence (available as part of the course) and a handful of social media posts. The launch represented less than 50% of my monthly sales targets.

This was only possible because I’ve spent the last five years building my email list - a task that can seem daunting when you first start - but is the most important thing you can do for your business.

In this podcast episode, I show you 39 surprisingly easy ways to increase your email subscribers - starting with how to creating an effective lead magnet to attract email subscribers before moving on to how to actually get people to sign up to your list.

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes including all the links mentioned in this episode}.

Did you know that most online sales convert at around 1-2%?

Which means for every 100 people on your email list, only a small number will actually buy from you.

If you’re a coach or consultant selling 1-2-1 services and need 20 clients a year, you may only need a few thousand on your email list.

If you sell low-priced products or online courses/memberships you’ll almost certainly need to shoot for 10k or beyond.

Some products/services may convert a little higher (some of mine do), but even if you convert at 7 or 8% the vast majority of people are still going to say ‘no’ to you.

Which means you need a lot more people on your email list than you think.

Don’t have an email list yet?

Your conversion rate will be much lower.

While you might make the odd sale on social media, unless you have a large budget for paid advertising, it’s unlikely you’ll be able to make consistent online sales.  

This is because people aren’t on social media to buy. They’re on social media to socialise. And even when they do buy on social media, they are far less likely to purchase from unknown businesses/brands. Especially unknown brands with a small following - and very little engagement - on social media.

Which is why simply posting about your products/services on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram doesn’t work (if you’ve tried it, you’ll know exactly what I mean).

Lead magnet ideas for your business

If you want to make consistent sales in your business, you need to be in peoples’ inboxes.

But in a time when most people are suffering from information overload, getting people to give you their email address isn’t easy. This means you first need to attract your ideal customer. Then you need build a relationship with them. Then you need to give them a compelling reason to give you their email address (and the offer of adding them to your weekly newsletter isn’t going to cut it I’m afraid).

People generally only part with their email address for something that solves a problem for them - a discount code that saves them money or a template/checklist that saves them time, for example. This is generally referred to as a lead magnet.

A great lead magnet solves a specific pain point for a very specific customer, provides a quick ‘win’ and leads towards a specific product/service that you offer.

For example my media calendar solves a pain point for a specific type of customer (a business owner who is struggling to create a content plan), provides a quick ‘win’ (a downloadable template you can use to create a media calendar, including key dates and awareness days for January) and leads prospective customers towards a specific product (my 2019 Media Diary).

My 2019 Media Diary contains key dates and awareness days for every month of the year, which saves users hours of research - making it the next logical step for those who download my free media calendar. As soon as they download the calendar, they are offered the opportunity to buy the diary. If they don’t buy the diary on the first offer, they are reminded about it a number of times in the follow-up email sequence.

One my highest converting lead magnets is my marketing checklist series, which set out the key activities you need to be doing to hit key income goals in your business - 1k, 2k, 5k and 10k a month. These solve a very specific problem for a very specific type of customer (a small business owner who is unsure what marketing activities they should be using to hit their income goals) and leads towards a very specific service - the Love Marketing Membership. The resources in the membership are built around those key checklists, so once people have downloaded them, joining the membership is the next logical step (the checklists list the activities you need to do to hit your income goals, the membership contains the resources you need to achieve them).

I’ve recently also launched an audience calculator which helps you calculate how many email list subscribers you need to reach your sales targets. Again, this solves a very specific problem for a very specific type of customer - small businesses who want to grow their email list but are unsure what kind of numbers they need to reach their goals. The ‘quick win’ is of course getting the audience number you need.

Here are some ideas for lead magnets:

Checklists

Quizzes

Printables

Webinars

Online challenges

Reports/whitepapers

Video tutorials

Book chapters

Handbooks/eBook

Stock images/social media graphics

Infographics

Free trial

Samples (e.g. in goody bags)

If you have a product-based business, you may think you can only offer discount codes as your lead magnet - but this simply isn’t true. In fact, while discount codes can work in the short term, you may find some people join your email list to get your discount code/offer then unsubscribe as soon as they’ve made a discounted purchase. Creating an information-based lead magnet can be far more effective when it comes to attracting long-term subscribers.

  • For example, if you sell swimwear, you could create an interactive quiz (or even a pdf download) that tells people which style of swimming costume is best for their figure.
  • If you sell dog coats, you could create a guide to measuring your dog for a coat.
  • Sell compostable coffee pods? You could create a guide to buying a coffee machine for your home or office.
  • If you sell garden offices you could create the ultimate guide to buying one, including all the tricky questions around securing planning permission.
  • If you sell hair straighteners you could create a series of video tutorials demonstrating how to create specific styles.

Creating seasonal gift guides - that include your own products - can be a great way to attract people to your list.

If you have a product-based business, the key is to stop thinking about yourself as someone who sells products. So if you sell swimsuits, you are an expert in swimwear for women. If you sell dog coats, you’re an expert in dog attire (or even a particular type of dog). And if you sell compostable coffee pods, you’re an expert in that.

Although I sell a diary, I don’t see myself as someone who sells diaries. I see myself as an expert in content planning. The diary is just a tool I use for content planning that happens to be available for my clients to buy (see how different it feels when you say it like that). Not only does this make it easy for me to sell media diaries, it also makes it easier for me to market my product without feeling ‘selly.’

For example, around Christmas/New Year time I was invited to do guest interviews on a number of podcasts on the subject of content planning.

For example:

Four simple steps to planning your content in 2019 (Chris Ducker)

Planning your content for the next 12 months (The Membership Guys Podcast)

Content Planning and Content Repurposing  (Content 10x podcast)

Creating your first lead magnet

If you’re just getting started with email marketing, you’ll probably find that you have to create a few lead magnets before you hit on one that converts well for you. That’s why it’s important to keep it simple.

My very first lead magnet was a one page pdf - and if you’re creating your first lead magnet, I’d suggest you start with something simple like that. If you try to create something too complicated - or try to create multiple lead magnets at the same time - you may end up feeling overwhelmed. So just start with one -  you can always upgrade/add more later.

How to promote your lead magnet

People often ask me to tell them the one thing they should do to promote their lead magnet. The one thing you should do is: try to get the link for your lead magnet in as many places your ideal customer is spending time online as you can possibly can.  So that means trying a lot of things. As with anything in your business, you will probably find a handful of methods that work particularly well for you - in which case do more of those. But you won’t know until you try.

With that in mind, here are some ideas for promoting your lead magnet on different platforms.

Facebook

Post on your page

Post the link in relevant Facebook groups (only in response to questions though - no spamming!)

Share the link on Facebook Lives broadcasts

Start your own Facebook group

Add a link and call-to-action on your Facebook cover image

Facebook advertising

Post about it on your personal Facebook profile

Create a video trailer for your lead magnet and post it on Facebook

Send a message to your Facebook messenger subscribers

Invite people to opt-in via Facebook messenger when you’re at events

Twitter

Schedule multiple posts about it

Create a special Twitter cover image promoting your lead magnet

Create a pinned post with a link to sign up to your lead magnet

Add the link to your lead magnet in your bio

Take part in relevant Twitter chats (share the link in response to relevant questions)

Start your own Twitter chat and share it there

Create a dedicated hashtag that goes with your Lead Magnet and use it in posts/activity

LinkedIn

Write posts about it (asking questions that relate to the topic will work better than straight promotion)

Publish an article about it

Create a video trailer for your lead magnet and post it on LinkedIn

Add a link in the media section of your profile

Mention your lead magnet in your bio

Instagram

Write posts about it (asking questions that relate to the topic will work better than straight promotion)

Add the link to your lead magnet in your bio

Invite people to sign up to your lead magnet in your Instagram story

Website

Add pop-up banners with a call-to-action to sign up for your lead magnet

Add pop-ups/opt-in boxes in popular blog posts

Invite people to sign up on your ‘about’ page (likely the most visited page on your site)

Add sign up boxes in your sidebar

Email

Add a call-to-action in your email signature

Email your list to let them know about a new lead magnet

Guest content

Share the link to your lead magnet in podcast interviews

Write guest blog posts and share the link

Share the link when you’re speaking

Offer to teach guest classes for other business owners - and ask if you can share the link

Pinterest

Create dedicated pins for your lead magnet

Post dedicated pins on group boards

Invest in Pinterest advertising

Bonus ideas

Answer questions on Quora and share the link Quora

Review your favourite tech products and ask if you can share a link to your opt-in

Podcast show notes:

  • Why you need to build an email list (7:02)
  • How to choose your email marketing software (11:29)
  • Examples of lead magnets that work (17:56)
  • What mistakes you need to avoid when creating your lead magnet (25:02)
  • Examples of lead magnets for a product based service (29:38)
  • How to get people to open and engage with your emails (39:01)
  • How to get people onto your email list (42:30)
  • Where to share your lead magnet (and how to do it effectively) (45:30)
  • Why you need to keep testing and persisting with your lead magnet (1:01:10)

Resources

MailChimp

Active Campaign

Leadpages (Affiliate Link)

Convertkit

InfusionSoft

Rev (Affiliate Link)

Kapwing

LinkedIn Content Strategy Playbook

Episode 190: How to pitch yourself as a podcast guest

Episode 319: Why you should be using Pinterest in 2019 (plus how ot do it) with Eve Tokens

Quora

Apply for a place on the LinkedIn Content Strategy Masterclass here

Get your hands on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course now

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn

[330] How to write awesome sales copy for your business

Do you struggle to write sales copy for your business?

In this  podcast episode I share practical tactics for writing sales copy in your business including sales pages, marketing emails, Facebook ads and more. And I share the frameworks I use in my own business to help me write awesome sales copy - and do it fast.

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes}.

Here’s an overview of what I cover in the episode:

I spent 18 years writing and editing for national newspapers like the Guardian. I’ve also helped hundreds of business owners with copywriting. And if there’s one thing I’ve learned it’s this: if you’re struggling to write sales copy for your business, it’s not because you’re a bad writer and/or don’t have any ideas. It’s simply that you don’t know what you want to say and/or have a structure or framework to follow. With that in mind here’s five practical tips and tactics to help you write more effective copy in 2019 and beyond. 

1.Focus on the problem your product/service solves for your customer

Before you even think about writing sales copy for a product or service, you need to understand the problem you’re solving for your prospective customers or clients. You need to be able to articulate that pain point - and show how you can heal that pain.

This means you need to get specific. Let’s say you’re a Facebook ads specialist, for example. Saying that you have an online course for small business owners who are fed up wasting money on ads that don’t work or specifically for business owners with online membership communities is far more likely to resonate with potential customers than simply saying you have a course on Facebook ads for small business owners.

It can be scary to niche down on a very specific type of customer/client - or hone in on a very specific pain point - but if you try to appeal to everyone, you’ll end up appealing to no one.

2. Create a ‘core offer’

For every new product/service I launch I write a ‘core offer’ - around 200 words of sales copy that sets out exactly what I’m selling and who I’m selling it to. I use this core offer as the basis of all my ad copy e.g. email marketing, Facebook ads, sales pages, social media posts and more. This saves me hours of time as can literally just cut and paste the words  into different types of sales copy.

You can hear me teaching my four-step sales formula to one of my clients in this podcast episode: On-air coaching: how to write awesome sales copy. 

My sales formula, along with a tutorial on how to use it, is also available as part of my how to write awesome sales copy course (which also includes templates, cheat sheets and swipe files for email marketing, sales pages, Facebook ads and more).

Get my how to write awesome sales copy course.

3. Focus on benefits not features

People don’t buy your product or service because they want a ‘thing’. They buy because they want the transformation that comes with having that ‘thing.’

For example, people don’t buy my how to write awesome sales copy course because they want a bunch of video tutorials, templates and swipe files. They buy it because they want the transformation that comes with the course: becoming the kind of person who can simply open a word or Google doc and write great copy (without spending hours sweating over their keyboard).

And they don’t buy high-end handbags because they want a bag. Yes they need something to carry their belongings in, but why spend £500 when a £10 bag would do the job? They buy the £500 bag because they want the transformation that comes with having the bag. For some people that might be about feeling fashionable and stylish (because that makes them feel good). For others that might be about showing off to other people that they have money.

Whatever you think of their motivations, it’s important you understand that peoples’ buying decisions are driven by emotion. Which is why simply listing the features of your product or service in your sales copy will leave them cold. Focus on the transformation your product or service can offer and you’re much more likely to grab peoples' attention.

4. Create or follow a framework

If you’re struggling to write sales copy, it’s not because you’re not a good writer, it’s because you don’t know what you want to say. And without a plan or a structure to follow the task of writing a sales page, Facebook ad or an email marketing campaign can seem too overwhelming.

This is why I’ve created frameworks for all the sales copy I create in my business. For example, when I’m writing Facebook ads, I generally create around 12 ads for each campaign (so I can test out different combinations of copy and images to see what resonates with my audience).

Sitting down to write 12 ads (around 3600 words) could be quite a daunting task, But because I’ve created frameworks I can follow to write Facebook ads, I can write each one in around five minutes.

Here's how I do it.

I create three styles of ad for each campaign: aspirational, painful and playful (I generally do 3-4 of each) - most of which are built around my 200 word ‘core offer’ (I explain what this is in point 2). This means all I have to do is switch the opening sentence or two in each version of the ad to create a new one.  As a result, I can generally write copy for 12 ads in around 90 mins. Without that framework I think it could take all day.

You can get access to my Facebook ad writing formula in my how to write awesome sales copy course.

I have similar frameworks I follow for writing email marketing campaigns, events sales pages, social media posts, online course sales pages & more - all of which are also available in the course. 

Learn what's working on Facebook right now. 

5. Be conversational

If you want to engage your ideal customers/clients in your sales copy, they need to feel as if you’re talking just to them. That’s why it’s important to use a relaxed, conversational style, personal pronouns (i.e. ‘you’ and ‘you’re’) and use simple, accessible language. If you imagine you’re writing a post on your personal Facebook page or a letter to a friend, you should have it about right.

Want to stop stressing over your sales copy? Get my how How To Write Awesome Sales Copy course. 

Podcast shownotes

Here’s what you’ll learn in this episode:

  • How to access all the resources referenced in this podcast (3:45)
  • Why you need to understand the particular pain point your customer has (8:35)
  • How to nail your ‘core offer’ (15:42)
  • Why you need to focus on the transformation your customer will receive/experience
  • How to understand the particular pain point your customer has (if you are a product based business) (23:15)
  • Why you need to use writing frameworks to help you create your copy quickly (32:07)
  • The three different types of ad copy I write (32:10)
  • The three different types of email copy I use (35:22)
  • Why you need to get conversational with your sales copy (39:02)
  • Examples of ad copy that works (40:41)

Resources

Book your place on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course here 

Jennifer Hamley’s Website

Episode 325: Three social media posts that will help you generate sales today

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Janet Murray’s Facebook Page

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook