online business

[344] How to build your audience through a Facebook group

Is your Facebook group taking up all your time but not making you any sales in your business?

In this episode, I talk to Gordon Burcham, Martial Arts School Owner and Multi World Kickboxing Champion about how he is generating a six figure income from a Facebook group. He also shares the remarkable story of how he bounced back - and turned around his business - after losing his home, 12 years ago.


{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes including all the links mentioned in this episode}.

 

The importance of perseverance in business

Today, as well as a hugely successful Facebook group, Gordon runs a 400 plus member martial arts school, but he and his family have overcome significant hurdles to achieve this success. Twelve years ago he lost his house while trying to build his business: “I was an instructor but I didn't understand business. I was just throwing money at advertising and didn't really know what I was doing,” he recalls.

Despite struggling to feed his family on £25 a week, he borrowed money and sold his possessions to invest £3,000 a month in a business coach. In less than 90 days, he was generating £10k a month in his business.

Turning his business around meant weeks of 16 hour days, when he and his wife walked the streets, pushing leaflets through peoples’ doors.

But Gordon believes many business owners aren’t prepared to put in this kind of  perseverance. “Most people don't want to do the hard work,” he says. “They’re lazy marketers and they're lazy in their business. They're not willing to do what it takes. I'll just do more than the other people are willing to do.”

How changing his marketing strategy helped Gordon turn his business around

When Gordon looked at why his business was failing he realised that by trying to market his martial arts classes to everyone, he wasn’t appealing to anyone. So he started to niche down the programmes he offered.

He began to target specific demographics - starting a ‘ladies only programme, for example and creating leaflets and landing pages specifically designed to appeal to women.”

And instead of relying on one or two marketing strategies to generate sales, he introduced a marketing mix. And when he started to use a combination of online and offline marketing activities e.g. leaflets, emails, networking and referral marketing, his business really started to take off.

The power of mentors/coaches

Gordon believes that investing in business coaching has helped him accelerate his business success by around 10 years. But many business owners aren’t prepared to invest in themselves, he says.

Too many people tell themselves they don’t need a coach because they’ve read all the books and done all the courses. But knowing and implementing are two completely different things. And many business owners need to hear the same information, over and over, in different ways, before it really sinks in.

“Repetition is so important,” he says. “You need to hear the same information from your coach and you need to hear it in different ways. And you have to repeat it enough for it to sink from your conscious to your subconscious mind.”

(Listen to episode 257: Do you need to pay to play for more information on why investing in yourself is vital for your business.)

How to harness the power of live video

Live video is now a huge part of Gordon’s marketing strategy. “It is so powerful because it creates a deeper connection between you and your audience,” he says.

He repurposes his Facebook Live videos by downloading them and getting transcriptions from Rev.com  (Affiliate Link) and turning them into blog posts. This content now forms the basis of a membership site,  for which he charges £47 + VAT per month - meaning he is truly leveraging the time spent recording those Facebook Live videos.

Gordon understands that many people are nervous about going live on Facebook and admits it’s taken him a long time to do it with confidence. “When people see me on stage, I'm very out there, very dramatic and I've got a lot of energy. But I've taught myself to do that. It's not natural,” he says.

How Gordon has built a profitable Facebook group

The Martial Arts Mastery is an extremely successful Facebook group turning over a quarter of a million pounds despite having only 1,400 members.

Gordon explains that the key to his Facebook group’s success is that it’s very niche (only martial arts school owners from the UK are allowed to join).

There are several things that Gordon does to encourage engagement in the group. These include:

  • Welcoming new members as soon as they join the group
  • Posting daily content in the group
  • Going live inside the group at least once a day
  • Asking for likes and comments on his Facebook Live broadcasts
  • Running regular competitions inside the group
  • Asking members to share their opinions on martial arts related topics (and not being afraid of being controversial)
  • Checking your stats and only posting within the optimum time slot

(Listen to episode 265 for tips on how to get more engagement in your Facebook group.)

He is not afraid to make paid offers to the group because he is providing free valuable content on a daily basis. If you’re adding value, you’ve “earned the right to sell.” he says.  And in the early days he offered free coaching in exchange for testimonials. In fact he still does this now - all he asks is that members share their successes in the Facebook group.

 

Podcast show notes:

  • Gordon’s business story (4:55)
  • Why you need to niche down who you’re targeting (13:05)
  • Why persistence pays off and you need to work through the fear (16:04)
  • How to grow your Facebook group and keep your audience engaged (26:25)
  • How to structure your time to create content for your Facebook group (33:38)
  • Why you need to invest in training - and then put it into practice! (39:35)
  • How to sell in your Facebook group (44:10)

Resources

Gordon’s website

Gordon on Facebook and LinkedIn

Rev.com (Affiliate Link)

Episode 327: Why I’m closing my 13.5k Facebook group

Janet Murray’s Prospecting Kit

Purchase the ‘How to create coaching packages’ masterclass here

Join the waitlist for the Build Your Audience Programme here

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Join the priority wait list for Build Your Audience Live Event here

Apply for a place on the LinkedIn Content Strategy Masterclass here

Get your hands on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course now

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn

 

[340] How to create a coaching or consultancy package for your business

Do you offer coaching, consultancy and training and find yourself spending hours creating bespoke proposals every time a prospective client gets in touch?  

Or perhaps you’d like to offer some kind of coaching, consultancy or training but you’re not sure what you should be offering and you keep procrastinating about it and never actually get anything done?  

Or have you been asked to deliver some sort of coaching, consultancy or training but you’ve not followed up on those requests because you’re just not sure what to offer and how much to charge?

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes including all the links mentioned in this episode}.

Step one - Do your market research

The first step is to understand what your customers or clients are struggling with so that you can put a package together that will really help them.

Often you’ll find there’s a particular topic prospective clients ask you about all the time. If not the easiest way to find out what your ideal customers or clients are struggling with...is to ask them.

This is exactly what I did when I was putting together my new Build Your Audience coaching package.

If you don't have a large social media following, make a list of five or ten ideal clients and ask for a quick call with them. Bonus: as you're talking it through with them, they may even ask about working with you.

Got a good-sized following on social media...ask for feedback there. For example, I asked for feedback on LinkedIn for the draft version of Build Your Audience coaching package on LinkedIn, as I know that’s where my ideal clients hangout. Two people replied outlining exactly what they would want in my coaching program, including how many hours of coaching they would want and how frequently they’d want to see me, which was incredibly valuable.

And do keep a record of the conversations you have. If you can use the words and phrases your ideal clients use on your sales pages and/or in your marketing materials, they’ll be far more likely to buy from you (because they’ll feel you really understand their pain points).

So, this first step is all about doing your market research and making sure that you're creating a coaching package that people actually want – not the one that you think they want.

Step two - Decide on a topic

If you've done your market research and taken time working through step one, this step should be easy.

Step three - Carry out an audit of existing materials

I work with so many coaches, consultants and experts who have already created some amazing resources – for example webinars, video tutorials, podcasts, checklists – but have never really thought about how to put them together into an online course or programme.

Carrying out an audit of your existing content can be a great way to highlight which content you’ve already created that would fit well in your new package - something you can offer to all your clients - which will add value and save you time.

Step four - Decide on your daily rates

Almost every coach, consultant or expert I talk to struggles with pricing.

While there are many approaches to setting your rates, one that works well for many is to start by looking at how many working days there are in the year. This generally works out at around 232 days (excluding weekends and bank holidays) if you're in the UK - minus 20 days for holidays and sick days.

Then, divide this number by how much you want to earn. For example, if you want to earn £30,000 from your coaching or consulting a year, that’s £129 a day.

Now consider the preparation and research time it will take to put a day’s training/consultancy together plus travel time. You might also want to factor in time for marketing - plus the cost of any training that you've done that allows you to deliver that particular kind of training/consultancy. Your daily rate of £129 could actually rise to several hundred - or even into the thousands.

Consider the return on investment, too. How much more revenue will a company be able to generate as a result of your training? Think less about your day rate for delivery and more about what the transformation is worth to that company and factor this into your price.

You might even want to think about per person rates. And do remember most companies will actually have a training budget for each person. So if you train a group of ten people, how much value might each participant be able to add to that company as a result of your training. When you look at it that way, your £3k day rate could suddenly turn into £30k or even £300k. Remember you are selling the transformation, not the training/consultancy itself.

Step five - Writing your core offer

The next step in putting together a coaching/consultancy package, is to write a summary of what you’re offering that you can use in your marketing. This is typically around four sentences long, starts with a question that identifies your ideal customers and ends with a clear call-to-action e.g. 'register here' or 'book your discovery call.' I generally refer to this as your 'core offer'.

Creating a clear core off before you even attempt to write a sales page, can save you tons of time in the long run.

There's lots more information about this in my How to Write Awesome Sales Copy Course and there’s a whole class on how to do this in my membership community.

Step six - Creating your coaching/consultancy package

This is where you set out your coaching/consultancy packages and summarise what’s included in each.

I have a unique approach to this that I often compare to a set menu in a Chinese restaurant. These typically have set menu A, set menu B, and set menu C, rising in price per person (A being the least expensive and C the highest). You’ll often find the same ‘dishes’ in all three set menus, but menu C will typically contain more expensive ingredients than menu A.

To create your coaching package, get a sheet of paper, divide it into three columns, and then divide your services into options A, B, and C, each rising in price - just like the Chinese restaurant set menu.  As you go across the columns, think about how you can add additional value. There is an example of this in my masterclass on how to create a coaching/consultancy package for your business.

There’s no reason why you can’t take your coaching programme for individuals or small groups and turn it into an offer for corporate clients. For example, I usually find that corporate clients are looking for the same things: content, strategy, research, training, coaching or done-for-you services.  Typically they’ll only be looking for two or three of those things at one time (content, strategy and training) which is why I create consultancy packages around these three things. There is an example of this in my masterclass on how to create a coaching/consultancy package for your business.

Coaches, consultants and experts often tell me they couldn’t possibly create a coaching/consultancy package because all their clients are different. But this is just not true. When you can pinpoint the commonalities in the type of work you do and the things you get asked to do all the time, it’s actually really easy to create coaching/consultancy packages.

This will save you huge amounts of time and free you up to make more money.

Step seven - Create a legal agreement

Creating a legal agreement that can be adapted for each client is well worth doing. Not only will it save you time, it can also protect you and your business from late or non-payers.

I use templates from Suzanne Dibble’s Small Business Legal Academy. I’ve used her resources for many of my coaching agreements. For £100 a year you can access templates for many different legal agreements that you might need in your coaching/consultancy business and it's definitely well worth the investment.

Step eight - Create a fair play agreement

Creating a document that sets out exactly what your clients should expect from you - and what you expect from them - can also help prevent problems with coaching/consultancy clients.  

I've recently introduced fair play agreements for my membership and all my online courses. These include information on key things including my working hours, response times (from myself and my team), what’s included (and what isn’t) and how to get the most out of the programme.

Setting your expectations out from the beginning in this way can prevent problems further down the line and paves the way for a smooth working relationship.

You can see an example of one of my fair play agreements in my  masterclass on how to create a coaching/consultancy package for your business.

Step nine - Prospect your leads

Next it’s time to road test your new package to see what works and highlight what doesn't work so that you can make any necessary tweaks and changes.

At this stage it’s much more important to focus on your warmest leads – generally people you've already got a relationship with. A common mistake I see coaches, consultants and experts make when it comes to putting out new coaching offers is focusing on content marketing, email list building, guest blogging, podcast interviews, social media posts and speaking.

Whilst all of these things are important, it can take months for these kind of activities to convert into leads and sales.

Instead, focus on your warmest leads – generally people you already have a relationship with. This can be previous clients or people who’ve previously reached out to you but for some reason haven’t worked with you yet. Because you already have a relationship with these people, high-touch activities e.g. email, letter, or phone will work best.

Offering a special rate to road test your new coaching/consultancy package is a great way to get feedback and generate testimonials - all vital for the future success of your programme.

Step ten - Make the offer

When the time comes to reach out and make the offer, it’s important to do it with confidence.

I see too many coaches, consultants and experts create awesome coaching/consultancy packages they are too afraid to sell.

When you’re reaching out to potential clients, it’s worth reminding yourself of the worst possible thing that can happen.

Someone says no to you.

Which is really not so bad is it?

Podcast show notes:

  • Why it’s important to create coaching or consultancy packages (6:57)
  • How to do your market research (10:42)
  • How to repurpose your content (16:00)
  • How to set your prices (18:30)
  • How to create sales copy for your new coaching package (24:10)
  • How to create packages at different price points (27:10)
  • How to turn a coaching package into an offer for a corporate client (32:50)
  • Why you need a fair play agreement for all your packages (39:40)
  • How (and why) you should road test your package (41:55)
  • How to sell your coaching packages to cold, warm and hot leads (43:10)

Resources

Episode 339: How to build an audience for an online course or membership

Purchase the ‘How to create coaching packages’ masterclass here

Join the waitlist for the Build Your Audience Programme here

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Join the priority wait list for Build Your Audience Live Event here

Apply for a place on the LinkedIn Content Strategy Masterclass here

Get your hands on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course now

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

 

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn

[337] The tools I am using to build my online audience

When you're doing business online, the more tasks you can automate, the more time you have to serve your customers/clients. Plus you'll be able to build your audience quicker. 

In this episode I share the tools I use every day in my business that save me tons of time, including everything from email marketing and content creation to handling my finances.

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes including all the links mentioned in this episode}.

Tools for email marketing & automation

Keap

I use Keap (formerly Infusionsoft) for my email marketing. I love it because it allows me to automate so many tasks in my business – and not just email marketing campaigns.

When I’m working with clients, speaking at events or even sleeping, thanks to Keap, new customers can sign up for my online courses and existing customers can get notifications about upcoming masterclasses, coaching calls, or other products and services that might be of interest to them.

For example, when new customers come on board my membership community the Love Marketing membership, they are sent a series of automated welcome emails directing them to various resources to help them get the most out of their membership.

When I’m organising events, Keap really comes into its own. I can create a series of automated emails to send to everyone who’s bought a ticket, sharing the next steps, telling them what to expect from the event and what they should bring with them, plus loads of other details that really make them feel like they’re an important part of the event.

It’s useful for post-event sales too. Automated emails can encourage people to book the next event, follow up with their favourite speakers and provide useful feedback. This shows delegates that you care about the quality you’re providing them.

Another of Keap’s useful features is the tagging system, which helps me and my team understand more about my customers’ preferences, meaning we can serve them better.

For example, we can track which cheat sheets or checklists subscribers have downloaded, how many webinars they’ve attended and the links they’ve clicked on in every email.

We can also see if someone has checked out a product a couple of times but decided not to buy and follow up with them, asking (what I think) is one of the best marketing questions ever: why didn't you buy?

For example in the case of my 2019 Media Diary - an A4 desk diary that's full of key dates and awareness days you can use for content planning - we have an automated sequence of emails for people who've looked at the diary but haven't bought. We call this a 'looked not bought' sequence. Sometimes they aren't buying due to not having all the information about the product - or perhaps even misunderstanding something about it. If we know this, we can give them the information they need to make a decision. And even if they decide not to buy, this is helpful information for our future marketing.

Keap isn’t cheap, so if your list is still quite small - maybe 500 subscribers or fewer - it might not be worth it. If you have a substantial email list, though, it’s worth every penny. You’ll need to invest some time in training or even consider outsourcing the campaign building but in terms of growing your audience, increasing sales and understanding your customers’ needs, it would be hard to beat.

The cost starts around $199 but you have to factor in initial training costs of around $2,000, too.

Calendly

Trying to organise meetings with other busy people can be a huge time-suck as you email back and forth about suitable dates and times.

Calendly, an appointment scheduling tool, helps me avoid all that. You can set it up for different types of meetings, so I use it for things like podcast interviews, membership induction meetings or discovery calls. This allows people to book straight into my diary for the relevant type of meeting in just a few clicks. If you're using Calendly, you do have to be organised each week and block off the spots in your diary where you know you’re already booked up with other things but it’s definitely worth the effort.

There’s a free version but it’s heavily branded. Prices without the branding start at $8 and for $12 you can access additional features like redirection to another website and Paypal and Stripe integration.

Wufoo

I use Wufoo to create simple surveys that help me understand my customers better.

For example, new members of my membership community the Love Marketing membership, are invited to fill out a questionnaire outlining the biggest challenges they’re facing in their business right now. I also ask all applicants for my mastermind programme and in-person mastermind to complete a short Wufoo questionnaire. This helps me quickly identify if the programme or event is a good fit for them. If it’s not I can suggest something more suitable – saving time and money on both sides.

As with most of the tools I use there is a free version but this comes with fewer features. The paid product comes in at $14 a month.

Tools for content creation

Rev.com

Rev.com (affiliate link) is an absolute lifesaver for anyone creating a podcast. I use rev.com to get transcripts for my podcast episodes (which we then turn into blog posts) and closed caption files I can add to my social media videos. This is particularly important for social media clips since most people are listening with the sound down these days. If you don’t add captions you’re almost certainly missing out on viewers.

Rev costs $1 a minute so can be costly if for a longer podcast but it’s amazing value for shorter social media videos. And because the transcripts are done by humans, it’s a highly accurate service which saves you loads of time on editing. Turnaround is generally 24 hours or less but often much sooner.

Trint is another option I've heard being recommend. Transcripts are automatically generated with this one so you may have to factor in time to go through and correct any mistakes.

Kapwing

After generating a closed caption file from rev.com (.srt file), I use Kapwing to add permanent captions to my social media videos in minutes.

While you can upload an .srt file to Facebook or LinkedIn I find this isn’t always reliable. Having the captions permanently burned onto my videos means I can use them across multiple platforms without having to fiddle around getting .srt files to upload properly.

This is a big timesaver. Kapwing has tons of other cool features including tools for making, editing and resizing GIFs.

Kapwing is a start up business, constantly innovating so I’m actually really looking forward to seeing what they come up with next.

Kapwing is free if you're happy to live with their Watermark. If you'd like to remove the watermark in a single video it's $6. Otherwise it's $20 a month.

Zoom

I use Zoom video conferencing pretty much every day to host group coaching calls, meetings, consultancy calls and webinars. I love being able to share my screen on coaching calls (and that my clients can share theirs too) and even make annotations. Being able to record meetings for later use is also a bonus.

My favourite feature, though, is the waiting room function, which means you can use one link for a specific type of call but ensure they stay private. For example, when I am hosting induction calls for my membership community, I can do them back-to-back using the same link, without worrying some will 'crash' the call.

It’s incredibly handy if you’ve scheduled back-to-back meetings with different people or for those people who always show up to webinars early.

Prices start at £11.99 for small teams.

Headliner

You may have seen the short teaser videos I use for my podcast episodes – people are always asking me how I create them.

Using Headliner it’s really easy. Simply upload a .wav file, add a background canvas (we make these in Canva) and Headliner will do the rest, including generating the captions for you. The captions usually require a bit of editing but they are constantly improving the service.

Headliner is free to use for the moment.

Wistia

I use Wistia to host tutorials for my online courses, membership and also for training videos for my team (it integrates well with our team messaging app Slack).

I particularly love the analytics. You can track which videos people have been watching, where and for how long, which is invaluable as a course creator and membership site owner.

Price-wise, you can get up to three videos for free, but they will feature the Wistia branding. Paid services come in at $99 a month and include 10 free videos. Additional videos are 25c each.

Loom

I use Loom pretty much every day to make instantly shareable screen recordings including demos for clients and team members. This could be a particularly useful tool for creating demos for any products you’re trying to promote.

The best part – it’s completely free (no strings attached).

Podcast tools — Libsyn and Blubrry

Regular podcasters will know that podcast audio files are too big to store on your website so if you’re thinking of starting your own podcast, you’ll need to find an alternative storage solution.

I use Blubrry and Libsyn to host my podcast episodes.

Blubrry is great for helping me analyse my podcast statistics, telling me how many listeners I’ve had in any given time period.

Libsyn starts at $5 but cost varies depending on how much content you produce. I pay $24 a month.

Blubrry costs $5 a month.

(Just as an aside, some of you will have heard me mention my new Rode Podcaster Mic. I haven’t started using it yet but when I do, my trusty Blue Snowball, the mic I’ve used to create over 300 podcast episodes, will be facing retirement. I’d love to give it a good home so I’ve decided to give it away to someone who’s determined to start their own podcast. The only caveat is, you have to promise to see it through. Get in touch if that sounds like you.)

Leadpages

I’ve been using Leadpages (affiliate link) to create landing pages for years. These work really well for webinar sign ups, thank you pages, event waitlists and other pages that don’t require a huge amount of interaction.

They’re incredibly easy to use, even for non-techy people. You can choose from a range of pre-designed templates to suit your particular purpose and play about with colours, fonts and images to fit your brand.

The best bit though, is that all of the designs are tried and tested so you can choose the highest-converting template for the job. Knowing that the ‘buy now’ button is on the right hand side (for example) because the designer has tested numerous layouts and that’s the one that converts the best, is really reassuring.

Prices start at $25 a month.

Smarter Queue

I’ll admit that I’m not a huge fan of social media scheduling – I think it can, if overused, lead to dull content and less engagement. I far prefer organic content.

That said, I do schedule tweets. I used to use Meet Edgar because you could put your content in a library to be reposted at a later date but a change to the Twitter rules last year means you can no longer do this.

Smarter Queue (Affiliate Link) has somehow found a way around that, which is why it’s found its way into my list of frequently-used tools!

Pricing starts at $13.99 a month for up to four accounts and is paid annually.

Tailwind

Tailwind is a great scheduling tool for anyone trying to build their audience on Pinterest –particularly if your audience is scattered around different time zones.

You can sign up for a free trial and prices start at $9.99 a month.

Money tools

I use Stripe to take payments for most of my products and services. I particularly like the reporting tools, which allow you to track your income across the week, month, quarter and year as a whole.

It’s also great for making comparisons between different time periods, for example, the number of sales you made this February compared to last.

With Stripe, you pay for what you use as you’re charged a percentage of each sale.

Paypal is another tool I use to take payment for most of my products and services.

I love that most people are familiar with PayPal (so my customers generally don’t have any trouble using it) and that you don’t actually need a PayPal account to pay via PayPal.

It’s also really handy for setting up recurring payments (great for mastermind programmes or payment plans for events) and you can integrate PayPal with a number of shopping cart systems, including Woocommerce (which I use in my shop).

Xero

I use Xero’s cloud accounting software for my bookkeeping. It’s great for giving you a snapshot of your current business finances.

I particularly like the reporting tools, which allow you to generate real time reports on your income and compare between different time periods.

As I have multiple streams of income in my business, I also like being able to break my income into different ‘sources’ and track how each one is doing.

Prices start at $9 a month.

Organisation tools

Prior to using Slack I was communicating with my virtual team in many different ways (email, Facebook Messenger, etc). It worked but it was all just a bit messy.

Using a single method of communication has made us all so much more efficient and saved us loads of time. We now use Slack for our team messaging and what I find particularly useful is being able to create different channels for different products and services.

It’s free for smaller teams but if you have a larger team and want to make it your main communication hub, the price goes up to $5.25 per user, per month.

I’ve just started using Trello with my team so it’s probably too early to give it a proper review but it does have some cool project management features.

You can create different boards for different projects, break projects into individual tasks, assign the tasks to the relevant team member and set deadlines.

Trello costs $9.99 per user, per month.

Google Drive

G Suite is another tool that we’re only just getting to grips with. We’re having a few teething problems with granting access permissions to different users but I have high hopes for this one in the long run.

The price for this is $6 per month.

Podcast show notes:

  • Tools for email marketing and automation (7:35)
  • Tools for quick and efficient dairy keeping with your team and clients (22:22)
  • Tools for creating surveys and vetting clients/customers before you work together (25:04)
  • How to create transcripts that will help you write blog posts or video captions (27:35)
  • Tools for recording video calls or screen videos (34:10)
  • Tools for producing a podcast (37:38)
  • Tools for creating a landing page or sales page (39:30)
  • Tools for tracking your finances (44:55)
  • Tools for team communication and management (45:05)

Resources

Join the priority wait list for Build Your Audience Live here

Episode 335: How to create a high-converting lead magnet

Keap (Previously InfusionSoft) (Email Marketing)

Active Campaign (Email Marketing)

MailChimp (Email Marketing)

ConvertKit (Email Marketing)

Calendly (Diary organisation)

Zoom (Affiliate Link) (Video conferencing and recording)

Wufoo (Survey tool)

Rev.com (Affiliate Link) (Transcription service)

Kapwing (Video editing and captions)

Headliner (Video captions)

Wistia (Video recording)

Blubrry (Podcast hosting)

Libsyn (Podcast hosting)

LeadPages (Affiliate Link) (Landing page creation)

SmarterQueue (Affiliate Link) (Scheduling tool)

Tailwind (Pinterest scheduling tool)

Xero (Accounting tool)

Stripe (Payment and financial transactions)

Paypal (Payment and financial transactions)

Slack (Team communication tool)

Trello (Project management tool)

Everhour (Time tracking tool)

Google Drive or GSuite (Document and file sharing)

Apply for a place on the LinkedIn Content Strategy Masterclass here

Get your hands on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course now

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn

[335] How to create a high-converting lead magnet

If you want to attract leads and sales for your business, you need an email list. But in a time when most of us are overwhelmed with information, inviting people to sign up for your lead magnet is not enough.

In this episode, I break down the steps you need to take to create a successful lead magnet - from choosing a topic for your lead magnet to how to set up a sales funnel that converts into sales.

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes including all the links mentioned in this episode}.

What is a lead magnet?

A lead magnet is a resource or information product you create with the purpose of encouraging your ideal customers/clients to sign up to your email list.

There are so many different types of lead magnet you can create: quizzes, cheat sheets, checklists, challenges, free book chapters, whitepapers, video tutorials, templates - just to give you a few examples.

But when you’re just getting started, it really is best to keep it simple. In my online course, How To Create a High-Converting Lead Magnet, I recommend starting with a one or two page downloadable pdf.

What makes a great lead magnet?

A great lead magnet solves a specific type of problem for a specific type of customer/client, offers a quick win and (crucially) leads your subscribers towards a paid product/service.

One my highest converting lead magnets is my marketing checklist series, which set out the key activities you need to be doing to hit key income goals in your business - 1k, 2k, 5k and 10k a month. These solve a very specific problem for a very specific type of customer (a small business owner who is unsure what marketing activities they should be using to hit their income goals) and leads towards a very specific service - the Love Marketing Membership. The resources in the membership are built around those key checklists, so once people have downloaded them, joining the membership is the next logical step (the checklists list the activities you need to do to hit your income goals, the membership contains the resources you need to achieve them).

I’ve recently also launched an audience calculator which helps you calculate how many email list subscribers you need to reach your sales targets. Again, this solves a very specific problem for a very specific type of customer - small businesses who want to grow their email list but are unsure what kind of numbers they need to reach their goals. The ‘quick win’ is of course getting the audience number you need.

Lead magnets don’t necessarily have to be free. In fact, getting people to pay a small amount can mean you attract much more qualified leads - something I have been experimenting with recently.

Over the past five years I’ve created dozens of free ‘lead magnets’ - pdf guides, checklists, webinars, templates (just to give a few examples) and, most recently, an interactive audience calculator.

This has helped me grow my email list but here’s some interesting stats for you:

  • Only 30% of those who opted into my most popular lead magnet (my free marketing checklists) actually downloaded the materials in the 7 days after they became available.
  • Around 80% of those who bought my LinkedIn Content Strategy Playbook - priced at £9.99 - downloaded it in the first 24 hours.

Do lead magnets work for product-based businesses?

If you have a product-based business, you may think that offering discount codes is the only kind of ‘lead magnet’ you can create. This is simply not true.

In fact, voucher codes can be counterproductive, as they can encourage subscribers to join your list to get their discount code, then unsubscribe afterwards. Taking the time to create an information-led led magnet can actually be a much better way to build a relationship and encourage loyalty in your customers.

If you have a product-based business, the best kind of lead magnet usually involves teaching people how to use your product

For example, my 2019 Media Diary contains key dates and awareness days for every month of the year, which saves users hours of research - making it the next logical step for those who download my free media calendar. As soon as they download the calendar, they're offered the opportunity to buy the diary. If they don’t buy the diary on the first offer, they're reminded about it a number of times in the follow-up email sequence.

Here’s a few more examples of how it works in practice:

  • If you sell podcast microphones, you could create guide on how to create and publish your first podcast
  • If you sell wool, you could create a guide on how to get stains out of wool (one of my clients has done exactly that)
  • If you make candles, you could create a guide on how to make candles (sounds counterintuitive but some people will try to make their own, then realise it’s easier to buy yours)

The biggest mistake people make with lead magnets

The biggest mistake people make with lead magnets is making them too broad. But if you’re trying to appeal to everyone e.g. ‘5 tips for better self-care’ you’ll end up appealing to no one. Focusing on a specific self-care problem that affects a specific type of person is much more likely to appeal e.g. Ten ways to get a good night’s sleep with a newborn (yes it’s really possible).

I’ve listed some more examples for you below. The examples in the column on the left are too broad.

Creating your lead magnet

If you’re creating your first lead magnet, I recommend keeping it simple and sticking to a simple one or two page PDF.

Most coaches, consultants and entrepreneurs I know have something they teach their customers/clients every day which can be turned into a lead magnet in 30 minutes or less (there is a template for this in my How To Create A High-Converting Lead Magnet course).

It’s vital to have a really clear title that states exactly what problem your lead magnet will solve for your customer e.g. 39 easy ways to attract more email subscribers, how to write a press release for your small business, 29 unique gifts for coffee lovers. Your intro should explain how your lead magnet will solve that problem.

Why you need a landing page for your lead magnet

A landing page is a web page that has a single call-to-action e.g. ‘download my free gift guide for coffee lovers.’

Sending prospective email list subscribers to a page where they only do one thing (well, two really - opt into your lead magnet or not) means they can’t get distracted by other things e.g. sidebars, drop down menus, pop-ups etc. Which means they’re far more likely to join your list.

I use Leadpages to create landing pages for my lead magnets. You can choose from a range of templates (that can be customised with your own images, fonts and colours), and because the design has already been tested, you’ll be guaranteed a much higher conversion rate. Something as simple as changing the wording on your sign-up button e.g from ‘download my free guide’ to ‘get it now’ can have a big impact on your conversion. This is why it’s vital to keeping tweaking and testing your copy and images. Leadpages (which has a free trial) also allows you to split test different page designs/copy to see which convert better.

I’ve included a module on writing compelling copy for your landing page in my online course How To Create A High-Converting Lead Magnet.

How to create a nurture sequence

Once you’ve delivered your lead magnet, you need to start building a relationship with your new email subscriber. You do this by creating a nurture sequence - a series of emails that add further value and help you get to know your prospective customer. For a simple downloadable pdf, I recommend a series of five emails (there is a template for this in How To Create A High-Converting Lead Magnet).

While many new email subscribers won’t be ready to buy from you, some might. So don’t be afraid to make an offer in your nurture sequence.

Do make sure your practices are compliant with data protection law. You can find out more here in my podcast episode with Suzanne Dibble. They key things to know are: you mustn’t add people to your email list without their permission (given by choosing to tick a box - it must not be a pre-checked box) and it must be really clear what they’re signing up for.

How to promote your lead magnet

I wish I could tell you there was one thing you could do to get people to download your email lead magnet, but I can’t. The reality is, it’s a bit like throwing spaghetti at wall - you have to try lots of different thing to work out which will work best for you/your business.

However there are some strategies that work for most types of lead magnet/business.There is a list of ideas for promoting your lead magnet in 39 easy ways to grow your email subscribers. If I could give you one piece of advice, it would be this: get the link for your lead magnet everywhere your ideal customer/client is hanging out online. Everywhere.

Podcast show notes:

  • What is a lead magnet (3:50)
  • Examples of lead magnets that work for product based business (5:50)
  • Step 1 - understanding your customer’s pain point (9:40)
  • Why a paid lead magnet can have a higher rate of conversion (14:20)
  • Why your lead magnet needs to address a specific problem (18:40)
  • Step 2 - how to create a simple lead magnet (24:10)
  • How to get people to sign up to your lead magnet (34:10)
  • How to ensure your lead magnet converts into sales (37:22)
  • How to set up a sales funnel (42:18)

Resources

Register for the Lead Magnet Course here

Episode 333: 39 Surprisingly easy ways to increase your email subscribers

Leadpages (Affiliate Link)

Unbounce

MailChimp

InfusionSoft (now Keap)

Apply for a place on the LinkedIn Content Strategy Masterclass here

Get your hands on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course now

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn

[333] 39 Surprisingly easy ways to increase your email subscribers

In January 2019, I launched a new online course How To Write Awesome Sales Copy which generated £20k in sales. It was a fairly relaxed launch, based around my six-part launch sequence (available as part of the course) and a handful of social media posts. The launch represented less than 50% of my monthly sales targets.

This was only possible because I’ve spent the last five years building my email list - a task that can seem daunting when you first start - but is the most important thing you can do for your business.

In this podcast episode, I show you 39 surprisingly easy ways to increase your email subscribers - starting with how to creating an effective lead magnet to attract email subscribers before moving on to how to actually get people to sign up to your list.

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes including all the links mentioned in this episode}.

Did you know that most online sales convert at around 1-2%?

Which means for every 100 people on your email list, only a small number will actually buy from you.

If you’re a coach or consultant selling 1-2-1 services and need 20 clients a year, you may only need a few thousand on your email list.

If you sell low-priced products or online courses/memberships you’ll almost certainly need to shoot for 10k or beyond.

Some products/services may convert a little higher (some of mine do), but even if you convert at 7 or 8% the vast majority of people are still going to say ‘no’ to you.

Which means you need a lot more people on your email list than you think.

Don’t have an email list yet?

Your conversion rate will be much lower.

While you might make the odd sale on social media, unless you have a large budget for paid advertising, it’s unlikely you’ll be able to make consistent online sales.  

This is because people aren’t on social media to buy. They’re on social media to socialise. And even when they do buy on social media, they are far less likely to purchase from unknown businesses/brands. Especially unknown brands with a small following - and very little engagement - on social media.

Which is why simply posting about your products/services on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram doesn’t work (if you’ve tried it, you’ll know exactly what I mean).

Lead magnet ideas for your business

If you want to make consistent sales in your business, you need to be in peoples’ inboxes.

But in a time when most people are suffering from information overload, getting people to give you their email address isn’t easy. This means you first need to attract your ideal customer. Then you need build a relationship with them. Then you need to give them a compelling reason to give you their email address (and the offer of adding them to your weekly newsletter isn’t going to cut it I’m afraid).

People generally only part with their email address for something that solves a problem for them - a discount code that saves them money or a template/checklist that saves them time, for example. This is generally referred to as a lead magnet.

A great lead magnet solves a specific pain point for a very specific customer, provides a quick ‘win’ and leads towards a specific product/service that you offer.

For example my media calendar solves a pain point for a specific type of customer (a business owner who is struggling to create a content plan), provides a quick ‘win’ (a downloadable template you can use to create a media calendar, including key dates and awareness days for January) and leads prospective customers towards a specific product (my 2019 Media Diary).

My 2019 Media Diary contains key dates and awareness days for every month of the year, which saves users hours of research - making it the next logical step for those who download my free media calendar. As soon as they download the calendar, they are offered the opportunity to buy the diary. If they don’t buy the diary on the first offer, they are reminded about it a number of times in the follow-up email sequence.

One my highest converting lead magnets is my marketing checklist series, which set out the key activities you need to be doing to hit key income goals in your business - 1k, 2k, 5k and 10k a month. These solve a very specific problem for a very specific type of customer (a small business owner who is unsure what marketing activities they should be using to hit their income goals) and leads towards a very specific service - the Love Marketing Membership. The resources in the membership are built around those key checklists, so once people have downloaded them, joining the membership is the next logical step (the checklists list the activities you need to do to hit your income goals, the membership contains the resources you need to achieve them).

I’ve recently also launched an audience calculator which helps you calculate how many email list subscribers you need to reach your sales targets. Again, this solves a very specific problem for a very specific type of customer - small businesses who want to grow their email list but are unsure what kind of numbers they need to reach their goals. The ‘quick win’ is of course getting the audience number you need.

Here are some ideas for lead magnets:

Checklists

Quizzes

Printables

Webinars

Online challenges

Reports/whitepapers

Video tutorials

Book chapters

Handbooks/eBook

Stock images/social media graphics

Infographics

Free trial

Samples (e.g. in goody bags)

If you have a product-based business, you may think you can only offer discount codes as your lead magnet - but this simply isn’t true. In fact, while discount codes can work in the short term, you may find some people join your email list to get your discount code/offer then unsubscribe as soon as they’ve made a discounted purchase. Creating an information-based lead magnet can be far more effective when it comes to attracting long-term subscribers.

  • For example, if you sell swimwear, you could create an interactive quiz (or even a pdf download) that tells people which style of swimming costume is best for their figure.
  • If you sell dog coats, you could create a guide to measuring your dog for a coat.
  • Sell compostable coffee pods? You could create a guide to buying a coffee machine for your home or office.
  • If you sell garden offices you could create the ultimate guide to buying one, including all the tricky questions around securing planning permission.
  • If you sell hair straighteners you could create a series of video tutorials demonstrating how to create specific styles.

Creating seasonal gift guides - that include your own products - can be a great way to attract people to your list.

If you have a product-based business, the key is to stop thinking about yourself as someone who sells products. So if you sell swimsuits, you are an expert in swimwear for women. If you sell dog coats, you’re an expert in dog attire (or even a particular type of dog). And if you sell compostable coffee pods, you’re an expert in that.

Although I sell a diary, I don’t see myself as someone who sells diaries. I see myself as an expert in content planning. The diary is just a tool I use for content planning that happens to be available for my clients to buy (see how different it feels when you say it like that). Not only does this make it easy for me to sell media diaries, it also makes it easier for me to market my product without feeling ‘selly.’

For example, around Christmas/New Year time I was invited to do guest interviews on a number of podcasts on the subject of content planning.

For example:

Four simple steps to planning your content in 2019 (Chris Ducker)

Planning your content for the next 12 months (The Membership Guys Podcast)

Content Planning and Content Repurposing  (Content 10x podcast)

Creating your first lead magnet

If you’re just getting started with email marketing, you’ll probably find that you have to create a few lead magnets before you hit on one that converts well for you. That’s why it’s important to keep it simple.

My very first lead magnet was a one page pdf - and if you’re creating your first lead magnet, I’d suggest you start with something simple like that. If you try to create something too complicated - or try to create multiple lead magnets at the same time - you may end up feeling overwhelmed. So just start with one -  you can always upgrade/add more later.

How to promote your lead magnet

People often ask me to tell them the one thing they should do to promote their lead magnet. The one thing you should do is: try to get the link for your lead magnet in as many places your ideal customer is spending time online as you can possibly can.  So that means trying a lot of things. As with anything in your business, you will probably find a handful of methods that work particularly well for you - in which case do more of those. But you won’t know until you try.

With that in mind, here are some ideas for promoting your lead magnet on different platforms.

Facebook

Post on your page

Post the link in relevant Facebook groups (only in response to questions though - no spamming!)

Share the link on Facebook Lives broadcasts

Start your own Facebook group

Add a link and call-to-action on your Facebook cover image

Facebook advertising

Post about it on your personal Facebook profile

Create a video trailer for your lead magnet and post it on Facebook

Send a message to your Facebook messenger subscribers

Invite people to opt-in via Facebook messenger when you’re at events

Twitter

Schedule multiple posts about it

Create a special Twitter cover image promoting your lead magnet

Create a pinned post with a link to sign up to your lead magnet

Add the link to your lead magnet in your bio

Take part in relevant Twitter chats (share the link in response to relevant questions)

Start your own Twitter chat and share it there

Create a dedicated hashtag that goes with your Lead Magnet and use it in posts/activity

LinkedIn

Write posts about it (asking questions that relate to the topic will work better than straight promotion)

Publish an article about it

Create a video trailer for your lead magnet and post it on LinkedIn

Add a link in the media section of your profile

Mention your lead magnet in your bio

Instagram

Write posts about it (asking questions that relate to the topic will work better than straight promotion)

Add the link to your lead magnet in your bio

Invite people to sign up to your lead magnet in your Instagram story

Website

Add pop-up banners with a call-to-action to sign up for your lead magnet

Add pop-ups/opt-in boxes in popular blog posts

Invite people to sign up on your ‘about’ page (likely the most visited page on your site)

Add sign up boxes in your sidebar

Email

Add a call-to-action in your email signature

Email your list to let them know about a new lead magnet

Guest content

Share the link to your lead magnet in podcast interviews

Write guest blog posts and share the link

Share the link when you’re speaking

Offer to teach guest classes for other business owners - and ask if you can share the link

Pinterest

Create dedicated pins for your lead magnet

Post dedicated pins on group boards

Invest in Pinterest advertising

Bonus ideas

Answer questions on Quora and share the link Quora

Review your favourite tech products and ask if you can share a link to your opt-in

Podcast show notes:

  • Why you need to build an email list (7:02)
  • How to choose your email marketing software (11:29)
  • Examples of lead magnets that work (17:56)
  • What mistakes you need to avoid when creating your lead magnet (25:02)
  • Examples of lead magnets for a product based service (29:38)
  • How to get people to open and engage with your emails (39:01)
  • How to get people onto your email list (42:30)
  • Where to share your lead magnet (and how to do it effectively) (45:30)
  • Why you need to keep testing and persisting with your lead magnet (1:01:10)

Resources

MailChimp

Active Campaign

Leadpages (Affiliate Link)

Convertkit

InfusionSoft

Rev (Affiliate Link)

Kapwing

LinkedIn Content Strategy Playbook

Episode 190: How to pitch yourself as a podcast guest

Episode 319: Why you should be using Pinterest in 2019 (plus how ot do it) with Eve Tokens

Quora

Apply for a place on the LinkedIn Content Strategy Masterclass here

Get your hands on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course now

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn

[331] What it really takes to build an audience with John Lee Dumas

Are you struggling to build your audience right now?  John Lee Dumas, host of the Entrepreneurs on Fire podcast, tells all in this episode about how he built his business from the bottom up, including how niching down helped him stand out from his competition PLUS the most important thing you need to do to build your audience.

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes including all the links mentioned in this episode}.

Why John Lee Dumas started a podcast 

After graduating from college, Iraq war veteran John Lee Dumas served as an officer in the US Army.

After leaving the army, he spent eight years trying different roles in corporate finance, law and real estate but found he just couldn’t settle.

“After four years as an officer, I really did struggle for six years,” says the entrepreneur and international speaker. “Some of it was Post Traumatic Stress Disorder just coming back from a war. Some of it was just me not really finding the right thing for me.”

The turning point came when he started listening to business podcasts and was struck by the intimacy and connection he felt with the hosts. “I felt like I was getting to know their personalities and their likes and their dislikes,” he says.” And I was like, ‘these people [the hosts] are like my friends even though they don't know me nor have they ever heard of me. But man, they've got me through some really tough times. And they've brought me some unbelievable and incredible information and knowledge.’”

This inspired John Lee Dumas to start his own podcast - but he was determined to do things differently. “Nobody was doing a daily podcast interviewing successful entrepreneurs and talking about their worst moments,” he says. “Like their really low, low, dark moments. And how they came out of those moments, and just building a story around that.”

So he started a daily podcast show interviewing top entrepreneurs like Tim Ferris, Seth Godin, Gary Vaynerchuk and  Barbara Corcoran about their entrepreneurial journey - including their darkest moments. For example, when Janet Murray was interviewed on John Lee Dumas's podcast on how to get press coverage in newspapers, magazines and on radio and TV, he teased out the story of how she sacked her dad.

He explains: “I want my listeners to say, 'okay, Tim Ferris, Gary Vaynerchuk, Janet [Murray], they're rocking it now. They're having a blast. They're speaking around the world. They're doing their thing, they're inspiring people. But man, it wasn't always like this. They went through some tough times...so they [the listeners] can be like, ‘okay, if Janet experienced that and she got through it, she's sharing how she got through it, maybe I can take inspiration and motivation and courage from that and apply it to my life. And really keep going forward with that.’”

How John Lee Dumas built an audience for his podcast

Seven years on, John Lee Dumas has published around 2000 episodes of the Entrepreneurs on Fire podcast.  The show has had around 80 million listens.  This has enabled him to create a seven figure business, which he is keen to point out is “profit not gross.”

He built an audience for the podcast through what he refers to as his ‘power of 40’ strategy. This involved searching on conference websites for influential entrepreneurs and reaching out to 40 of them at a time to see if they would guest on his podcast.

“I thought:  if they're willing to do that, for free - because a lot of these speakers are not getting paid for sure - they're definitely going to be willing to wake up in the morning, keep their bathrobe on, grab a cup of coffee, sit down on Skype and have a conversation,” he says.

He figured that if he could create compelling interviews and high-quality digital collateral i.e. logos, banners and tweetables his guests could share easily with their followers, he could grow his own audience by leveraging theirs.

He explains: “After the interview went live I’d reach out to people and say ‘Hey, Janet, Seth, Gary, your interview went live with Entrepreneurs on Fire, I'd be honoured if you would share your story with your audience. Here's all the links to do so’...so I was having people like Seth Godin say: ‘John, I've never told the story of being arrested on the AOL campus before. It's just never come up. But wow, you brought that out because of your questions. And I can't wait to share this with my audience.’

His theory was correct. Once he’d landed his first few ‘A players’ - like Seth Godin and Tim Ferriss - it created a “snowball effect.”

Everyone wanted to be on his podcast.

And with a new show going live out 365 days a week he was able to grow fast.

How John Lee Dumas makes money from his podcast

Nowadays John Lee Dumas gets over 400 requests per month to be on his podcast which he now publishes eight to 12 times per month.

But it took around six months before he was able to monetise the podcast - first with sponsors (bringing in between $8,000 to $12,000 per month initially), and later with podcasting courses and mastermind groups. John Lee Dumas has since gone on to publish three journals (The Podcast Journal, The Freedom Journal and The Mastery Journal) and become an international speaker.

He admits he nearly didn’t start the podcast at all. About a month before it was due to go live, he got cold feet and almost went back to his day job, which he admits was a “dark, dark time.”  Hiring the business coach Jaime Tardy, host of the Eventual Millionaire podcast changed everything. She held him accountable and made sure he launched the podcast as planned.

Another dark moment, was three years into his business, when he realised he was working too hard and heading for burnout. “One day I remember just looking in the mirror and being like: ‘Yuck. I'm exhausted. I'm overweight. I'm tired more than I should be. I'm not healthy,’ he recalls.

This inspired him to hire a personal trainer and a nutritionist and focus on self-care. As a result his business hasn’t grown as much as it could have, but with a £3 million turnover 70-75% profit margins on everything he does - and a team of just three virtual assistants - business is still pretty good, he says.

Why creating a niche is crucial for building an audience

John Lee Dumas puts his success down to niching down on one specific thing. "My favourite word in the English language is 'focus', because I turn that into an acronym called Follow One Course Until Success,” he says. “So many people that are out there right now are doing all the things. They're going one mile wide in their reach and their focus, and they're just doing one inch deep kind of impressions everywhere, and they're not making any progress. But it's those people that just go one inch wide and one mile deep, and they dig down into that niche, until they just own it and they dominate. And guess what? They win on that level, and then they get momentum, and then they can start to broaden out and to build and to do other things.”

While he started out focusing on podcasting, John has broadened his niche to include journals (the Podcast Journalist, The Freedom Journal and the Mastery Journal), webinar coaching plus he has plans to launch a health-related business Fasting On Fire.

So what does John Lee Dumas think it really takes to build an audience?

“You need to be that one person who's doing that one thing better than anybody else.’”, he says. “And if you're doing that, then you have a chance to get that initial momentum. To get those first few raving fans, you kind of get the crack in that coconut you can kind of wedge open and get to that amazing coconut juice in the middle. But that's what it takes, is that initial streamlined diehard focus. Because that's where you're going to win.”

Podcast shownotes

  • John Lee Dumas’ business story (3:02)
  • How niching down helps build an audience (9:43)
  • How to approach and collaborate with ‘star players’ (14:39)
  • How to turn your podcast into a profitable business (18:00)
  • John’s lowest moments in business (20:31)
  • John’s one top tip for building your audience (and your business) (27:45)

Resources

John Lee Dumas’ Website

John Lee Dumas on Twitter and Instagram

John Lee Dumas’ Podcast: Entrepreneurs on Fire

Jaime Masters: Eventual Millionaire

Get your hands on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course now

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Janet Murray’s Facebook Page

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook