sales

[343] The three audiences you must build to create a profitable online business

Are you feeling frustrated because you're trying to build your online audience...but you still don't have enough clients?

While activities like social media marketing, blogging and building your email list are brilliant for attracting cold leads (i.e. people who don't know about you yet), research consistently shows that most people need at least 7 or 8 touch points with you before they buy. Which means it could take up to a year - or longer - before they are ready to buy from you. 

So if you’re prioritising attracting people who might be ready to work with you in a years’ time (your cold audience) over people who have the money and desire to work with you right now (your warm and hot audiences), you’ll soon find yourself short of clients.

That’s why it’s vital to remember that you actually need three audiences: hot, warm and cold and you need to be giving the right kind of attention to each. 

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes including all the links mentioned in this episode}.

1. Your hot audience 

Your hot audience includes the people who are most likely to buy from you. These are generally people you already have a relationship with e.g. your existing or previous clients/customers, friends/family. The marketing activities that generally work best for your hot audience are:

  • Personal emails
  • Personal messages (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc)
  • Phone calls
  • Meetings
  • Letters
  • In-person networking

These are generally referred to as high-touch marketing strategies and include a mix of on and offline activities. With high-touch marketing strategies, you would typically contact the prospect on a one-to-one basis.

Typical conversion time: If a prospect already knows, likes and trusts you, they may be able to make a buying decision immediately. Which is why hot audience leads can convert in 30 days or less.

If you're prioritising attracting clients who might want to work you in 12 months' time (your cold audience) over people who might want to pay you to work with them right now...you'll soon find yourself short on clients

2. Your warm audience 

Your warm audience is the second most likely group to buy from you. These people are generally aware of you - and may have expressed an interest in your product/service - but you don’t necessarily have a relationship with them. e.g. engaged social media followers, email list subscribers (who either haven’t bought anything from you or have only made a small investment so far), Facebook group members, friends-of-friends.

High-touch strategies can also work with warm leads but generally this group are still getting to know, like and trust you. So the marketing activities that tend to work best with your warm audience are:

  • Blogs
  • Podcasts
  • Webinars
  • Social media posts (high-value)
  • Facebook Lives
  • Books
  • Speaking
  • Lead magnets
  • Online networking
  • Retargeting ads (adverts that are shown to people who have already looked at your sales page)

These are generally referred to as medium or multi-touch marketing strategies that include more online than offline activities. With medium or multi-touch marketing strategies, you typically contact the prospect on both a one-to-one and one-to-many basis (e.g. automated emails sent to multiple recipients).

Typical conversion time: If a prospect already knows a little bit about you, they may be able to make a buying decision more quickly. But they still need to get to know, like and trust you. Which is why warm leads can take 3-6 months to get to the stage where they are ready to buy.

3. Your cold audience 

Your cold audience is the least likely group to buy from you. These people don’t even know you exist right now...so why would they buy from you right now?  This group still need to get to know, like and trust you so they also need to be nurtured with content. So the marketing activities that tend to work best with cold leads are:

  • Blogs
  • Podcasts
  • Webinars
  • Social media posts (high-value)
  • Facebook Lives
  • Books
  • Speaking
  • Lead magnets
  • Online networking
  • Facebook / Instagram ads

There’s no reason why you can’t target this group from ‘cold’ content e.g. Facebook ads or blog content, but you will probably find they need to see your content 6, 7 or 8 times before they buy.

These are generally referred to as low-touch marketing strategies that generally only include online activities. With low-touch marketing strategies, you typically contact the prospect on a one-to-many basis (e.g. automated emails sent to multiple recipients).

Typical conversion time: Most people need 7 or 8 touch points with you before they buy. Which is why it typically takes a year or longer to convert cold leads into buyers.

So if you want to boost your sales - quick - you need to focus on your hot audience and use high-touch strategies to reach them. That’s not to say you shouldn’t be thinking about your warm and cold audiences….you should be working on attracting and nurturing these people every single day.

Avoiding the ‘cold audience’ trap

Many coaches, consultants and experts fall into the trap of spending too much time on cold audiences...and barely any time on following up their hottest leads.

This is because your hottest leads tend to be people you’re working with right now or have worked with in the past. And these people typically respond best to high-touch activities e.g. email, phone calls etc.

The problem is, reaching out to family, friends or current/previous clients can make you feel embarrassed. While these people - the ones who already know, like and trust you - are the ones who are most likely to say ‘yes’ to you (or refer you to your ideal clients) - they’re also more likely to hurt you.

Because getting a ‘no’ from someone you know stings far more than getting a ‘no’ from a stranger, right? Which is why it's tempting to distract yourself with social media, blogging and creating email lead magnets....instead of reaching out to people who are ready to work with you right now. 

How much time should you spend on your cold, warm and hot audiences? 

The rather unsatisfactory answer is: it depends.

If you have enough clients and leads to keep you busy for the next 12 months, you may be able to spend as little as 30 minutes a day on your hot and warm audiences - freeing you up to spend time on your cold audience (which is typically more time consuming).

But if you need clients right now - if you’re struggling to pay your bills each month - it's time to get honest with yourself. Are playing in the cold ring i.e. focusing on your cold audience because it feels more comfortable than reaching out to your hottest leads? 

If the answer is 'yes' it's time to refocus. Here are the steps I'd recommend:

  1. Take an honest look at how much time you're spending each day on your cold, warm and hot audiences. Use a tool like Paymo or Toggl to track how you are spending your time.
  2.  If you're spending too much time on your cold audience, hit 'pause' on your cold outreach activities for a few days while you have a system in place for prospecting and following up with your hottest leads.
  3. Do an audit of your hot, warm and cold leads (as in the example above) and the activities that will work best for each
  4. Decide how much time you have each day/week for your cold, warm and hot outreach (I’d recommend getting into the habit of spending the first 30-60 minutes of your working day on hot outreach - you'll feel so much better knowing it's done.

Podcast show notes:

  • Why your marketing strategy isn’t attracting you any leads (5:15)
  • The three different types of leads you need (8:20)
  • How to reach out to your ‘hot’ leads and convert them into clients (11:02)
  • How to reach out to your ‘warm’ leads and convert them into clients (20:12)
  • The average conversion time for your warm leads (28:40)
  • How to reach out to your ‘cold’ leads and convert them into clients (32:30)
  • Why you shouldn’t spend all your time attracting cold leads (40:40)
  • How to prioritise your marketing strategies correctly (48:02)

Resources

Blog Post: How I chose the speakers for Build Your Audience Live

Episode 335: How to create a high-converting lead magnet

Keap (previously InfusionSoft)

Janet Murray’s Prospecting Kit

Purchase the ‘How to create coaching packages’ masterclass here

Join the waitlist for the Build Your Audience Programme here

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Join the priority wait list for Build Your Audience Live Event here

Apply for a place on the LinkedIn Content Strategy Masterclass here

Get your hands on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course now

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn

 

What to do if you're building your online audience...but you still don't have enough clients

Are you feeling frustrated because you're trying to build your online audience...but you still don't have enough clients?

If this sounds familiar, keep reading.

While activities like social media marketing, blogging and building your email list are brilliant for attracting cold leads (i.e. people who don't know about you yet), research consistently shows that most people need at least 7 or 8 touch points with you before they buy. Which means it could take up to a year - or longer - before they are ready to buy from you. 

So if you’re prioritising attracting people who might be ready to work with you in a years’ time (your cold audience) over people who have the money and desire to work with you right now (your warm and hot audiences), you’ll soon find yourself short of clients.

That’s why it’s vital to remember that you actually need three audiences: hot, warm and cold and you need to be giving the right kind of attention to each. 

Here’s a quick explainer:

1. Your hot audience 

Your hot audience includes the people who are most likely to buy from you. These are generally people you already have a relationship with e.g. your existing or previous clients/customers, friends/family. The marketing activities that generally work best for your hot audience are:

  • Personal emails
  • Personal messages (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc)
  • Phone calls
  • Meetings
  • Letters
  • In-person networking

These are generally referred to as high-touch marketing strategies and include a mix of on and offline activities. With high-touch marketing strategies, you would typically contact the prospect on a one-to-one basis.

Typical conversion time: If a prospect already knows, likes and trusts you, they may be able to make a buying decision immediately. Which is why hot audience leads can convert in 30 days or less.

If you're prioritising attracting clients who might want to work you in 12 months' time (your cold audience) over people who might want to pay you to work with them right now...you'll soon find yourself short on clients

2. Your warm audience 

Your warm audience is the second most likely group to buy from you. These people are generally aware of you - and may have expressed an interest in your product/service - but you don’t necessarily have a relationship with them. e.g. engaged social media followers, email list subscribers (who either haven’t bought anything from you or have only made a small investment so far), Facebook group members, friends-of-friends.

High-touch strategies can also work with warm leads but generally this group are still getting to know, like and trust you. So the marketing activities that tend to work best with your warm audience are:

  • Blogs
  • Podcasts
  • Webinars
  • Social media posts (high-value)
  • Facebook Lives
  • Books
  • Speaking
  • Lead magnets
  • Online networking
  • Retargeting ads (adverts that are shown to people who have already looked at your sales page)

These are generally referred to as medium or multi-touch marketing strategies that include more online than offline activities. With medium or multi-touch marketing strategies, you typically contact the prospect on both a one-to-one and one-to-many basis (e.g. automated emails sent to multiple recipients).

Typical conversion time: If a prospect already knows a little bit about you, they may be able to make a buying decision more quickly. But they still need to get to know, like and trust you. Which is why warm leads can take 3-6 months to get to the stage where they are ready to buy.

3. Your cold audience 

Your cold audience is the least likely group to buy from you. These people don’t even know you exist right now...so why would they buy from you right now?  This group still need to get to know, like and trust you so they also need to be nurtured with content. So the marketing activities that tend to work best with cold leads are:

  • Blogs
  • Podcasts
  • Webinars
  • Social media posts (high-value)
  • Facebook Lives
  • Books
  • Speaking
  • Lead magnets
  • Online networking
  • Facebook / Instagram ads

There’s no reason why you can’t target this group from ‘cold’ content e.g. Facebook ads or blog content, but you will probably find they need to see your content 6, 7 or 8 times before they buy.

These are generally referred to as low-touch marketing strategies that generally only include online activities. With low-touch marketing strategies, you typically contact the prospect on a one-to-many basis (e.g. automated emails sent to multiple recipients).

Typical conversion time: Most people need 7 or 8 touch points with you before they buy. Which is why it typically takes a year or longer to convert cold leads into buyers.

So if you want to boost your sales - quick - you need to focus on your hot audience and use high-touch strategies to reach them. That’s not to say you shouldn’t be thinking about your warm and cold audiences….you should be working on attracting and nurturing these people every single day.

Avoiding the ‘cold audience’ trap

Many coaches, consultants and experts fall into the trap of spending too much time on cold audiences...and barely any time on following up their hottest leads.

This is because your hottest leads tend to be people you’re working with right now or have worked with in the past. And these people typically respond best to high-touch activities e.g. email, phone calls etc.

The problem is, reaching out to family, friends or current/previous clients can make you feel embarrassed. While these people - the ones who already know, like and trust you - are the ones who are most likely to say ‘yes’ to you (or refer you to your ideal clients) - they’re also more likely to hurt you.

Because getting a ‘no’ from someone you know stings far more than getting a ‘no’ from a stranger, right? Which is why it's tempting to distract yourself with social media, blogging and creating email lead magnets....instead of reaching out to people who are ready to work with you right now. 

How much time should you spend on your cold, warm and hot audiences? 

The rather unsatisfactory answer is: it depends.

If you have enough clients and leads to keep you busy for the next 12 months, you may be able to spend as little as 30 minutes a day on your hot and warm audiences - freeing you up to spend time on your cold audience (which is typically more time consuming).

But if you need clients right now - if you’re struggling to pay your bills each month - it's time to get honest with yourself. Are playing in the cold ring i.e. focusing on your cold audience because it feels more comfortable than reaching out to your hottest leads? 

If the answer is 'yes' it's time to refocus. Here are the steps I'd recommend:

  1. Take an honest look at how much time you're spending each day on your cold, warm and hot audiences. Use a tool like Paymo or Toggl to track how you are spending your time.
  2.  If you're spending too much time on your cold audience, hit 'pause' on your cold outreach activities for a few days while you have a system in place for prospecting and following up with your hottest leads.
  3. Do an audit of your hot, warm and cold leads (as in the example above) and the activities that will work best for each
  4. Decide how much time you have each day/week for your cold, warm and hot outreach (I’d recommend getting into the habit of spending the first 30-60 minutes of your working day on hot outreach - you'll feel so much better knowing it's done.

 

[338] Why you feel scared of selling (and what to do about it)

Are you scared of selling? Are you crippled by nerves when it comes to pitching for new business or asking for the sale?

In this episode, sales expert Marcus Cauchi gives practical advice on overcoming your fears using tried and tested techniques that will allow you to make sales naturally and authentically.

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes including all the links mentioned in this episode}.

Why are most of us scared of selling?

Marcus believes this is down to things we were told as a child. Statements such as, “Children should be seen and not heard”, “The customer is always right” and, “You can’t trust salespeople” influence how we do business - and not always in a positive way.

“We’re conditioned from childhood to associate sales with slimy, pushy, self-interested sales people and therefore every experience we’ve had with them is largely negative. As a result, we try not to be one of them,” he explains.

And instead of seeing ourselves as being equal, we tend to put our customers on a pedestal – and in doing so we give away our power.

How to get your prospects to do the selling

One of the biggest mistakes people make in sales is to focus on themselves - rather than their prospect, says Marcus.

“When you talk about yourself you fall into a trap where, when you tell people stuff, they don't believe you. When you show them, they believe a little bit. When other people tell them, they'll believe some of it, but they always believe everything they tell themselves.”

An effective salesperson listens 70% of the time and talks 30% of the time. And when they do talk, they ask questions, rather than give information. This allows the prospect to tell their story, to talk about the pain they are experiencing and explore the possible solutions - meaning they actually end up selling to you.

This is very different to how sales is traditionally taught which typically involves the following steps: qualifying loosely for money, presenting features and benefits, then closing the prospect.

Marcus sees this as manipulative. He'd much prefer people volunteer for the sale and ask, "When can we start?"

This is a far more efficient, effective and authentic way of selling because people hate to be sold to but they love to buy.

How to plan your sales conversations

When people feel under pressure to make a sales, they tend to talk a lot and try to educate, says Marcus. But this doesn’t work because you’re telling the prospect what/how to think, rather than helping them draw their own conclusions.

To avoid this he suggests being clear on what you're trying to achieve in a conversation with a prospect: “All too often people go into a sales conversation with no plan,” he says.

It’s important to plan what your desired outcome is, and decide in advance on your best case scenario, what will be acceptable, what your worst acceptable outcome will be and what your walk away point is.

“Plan eight to ten great questions that will make your prospects prick up their ears. I believe we differentiate in the questions we ask, not the information that we give. That's where our credibility comes from,” says Marcus.

How to diagnose not sell

Marcus advises consultants and coaches to diagnose rather than sell - using the analogy of doctors who always diagnose before they prescribe.

An effective salesperson asks a series of questions, with permission, then nurtures the prospect through a discovery process where they self diagnose that they have a problem, he says.

The key is to help prospects discover for themselves why they want what you have to offer. The idea is to help them reach their own conclusion so they volunteer the sale and say: "I want you to help me. How do I pay? When can we get started?"

When you do this, you’re not pushing, says Marcus. In fact you're doing the opposite. You're not trying to convince – your prospect has to convince themselves.

How to voice your concerns/qualifying prospects

Qualifying your prospects is an essential part of the sales process, allowing you to make an informed judgement about whether you and the potential client or customer will be a good fit.

This can include voicing any concerns either party has about working together. Janet explains how in the past she has had concerns about event sponsors not having the resources to follow up the leads they gather as part of the sponsorship arrangement. She has learnt that it’s worth being honest about these concerns before agreeing to bring them on board as a sponsor.

Marcus agrees: “If you're going to have half-hour conversations with non-prospects, it's going to be a disaster. If on the other hand, you're going to have three to five-minute conversations with people so that you can qualify them in or out, that brings value and raises awareness and familiarity.”

He reminds us that too often, people focus on the wrong end of the problem and forget the question: “What's the thing we're trying to fix?”

Marcus’s Top Tips

  • Start with your intent - Your intent is not to sell, but to understand and make sure that the other person knows that you're there to help them, not yourself.
  • On sales calls and in meetings be clear, upfront about what you both want to happen, what you don't want to happen and what the boundaries are.
  • Ask quality questions, not bland, mundane questions. Then listen. Too often people are only silent long enough to look for the pause when they can jump in.
  • Slow down - allow for double or triple the time that you're currently putting in for sales calls to give you the time to ask the questions you have planned and your prospect the opportunity to answer fully.

Podcast Show Notes:

  • Marcus’s business story (8:30)
  • Why selling always has negative connotations (10:20)
  • How to change your selling behaviour so people will engage with you (and buy from you) (13:50)
  • How asking questions will help start a conversation (plus examples of how to do this) (15:52)
  • How to make your prospect feel comfortable (plus dealing with imposter syndrome) (21:50)
  • Why you shouldn’t try and please everyone (32:26)
  • How this technique can change your mindset both professionally and personally (38:25)
  • Why you shouldn’t be pushy when you’re selling (44:55)
  • Marcus’ key tips for improving your selling technique (47:15)

Resources

Marcus Cauchi: Website

Marcus on LinkedIn and Twitter

Apply for a place on the LinkedIn Content Strategy Masterclass here

Get your hands on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course now

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn

 

[336] How to make sales from your business blog

You think you’re doing all the right things to build a successful business blog. You’re showing up every week, you spend ages researching, writing and promoting, but it’s not making you any money.

In this episode, I break down the steps you need to take to create strategic blog content that people actually want to read - and will actually lead to sales. I look at the type of content you should be creating, how to find the right keywords to help people find you and how to gear your content towards your paid products and services.

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes including all the links mentioned in this episode}.

Create content your ideal customers are actually searching for

One of the biggest mistakes I see business owners making with blog content, is choosing topics that they want to write about rather than what their audience want to hear about. They assume that what interests them will interest their audience too, or use their blog as a way to vent about the things that are annoying them.

Another common mistake is to use creative but obscure blog titles. For example, one of my clients wrote a blog post entitled ‘Beginnings’. But when was the last time you did a Google search for ‘Beginnings’? That’s just not how people search for content online.

Think about your own online search behaviour — what was the last thing you typed into Google?

For me it was ‘Motorway service stations M1 KFC’. I was travelling along the M1, totally starving and I needed to find some food, fast. I was asking a very specific question to solve a very specific problem.

That’s how your customers search too. They don’t necessarily care about the topics that interest you, or your opinions - they just want to find the answer to their problems.

That’s why when you’re creating content for your blog it’s so important to get inside the head of your ideal customer. Ask yourself, what’s the problem they need help with? Which words or phrases would they use when they’re searching? What would they type into their search engine?

My client - the one who started off with obscure blog titles - is killing it now. She’s writing topics like, ‘five fundamentals to choosing a career you love’ and, ‘seven lessons from being on the brink of burnout’ because these topics tap in to the things that keep her customers up at night. The things they’ll actually be searching for on Google.

Make sure your content links to your paid products and services

You’ve read a million times that blogging is great for brand awareness and establishing expertise but don’t forget that your business blog is there to drive sales too. Which means you shouldn’t shy away from linking your content to your paid products and services.

In fact, doing so is mutually beneficial — you’ll increase your sales and your audience will benefit too. After all, they need the products you’re selling or they wouldn’t have landed on your page in the first place. Not giving them the opportunity to buy would be doing them a huge disservice.

Start by making two lists - one on the most common questions people ask you generally about your industry, the other on more specific questions customers ask you in relation to your products or services. You can then use these questions to generate topic ideas, which you can link back to your paid products (including information on how people can buy from you).

Take my Media Diary as an example - it’s an A4 desk diary full of key dates and awareness days that will help you plan your content.  More general questions people may ask are, ‘How do I create a content plan?’ or, ‘What should I post on my blog?’. More specific questions, about my Media Diary include things like, ‘What size is the diary? or, ‘How do I use the diary?’.

The first list is a great springboard for general ‘How to’ content that will answer the question and offer the Media Diary as a potential solution, and will include a call-to-action (where I show readers how to order the diary), while the second list gives me a host of ideas that I can turn into blog posts, all of which will encourage diary sales.

How to do keyword research

Once you’re creating content people want to read, the next step is making sure that your ideal customers can actually find it - ideally on the first page of Google. This is where keyword research comes in.

A lot of this is down to common sense and goes back to my earlier point about getting into your customer’s head and thinking about the kind of things they’ll be searching for online. But using keyword tools can help you refine your terms.

The first thing to do, now that you have some topic ideas in mind, is to find your keyword sweet spot — ideally you want a term that people are searching for, but not one that is so popular that your post will get lost in the noise of the competition.

Narrowing things down can help with this. For example, the phrase ‘how to write a press release’ is a very popular search term. Using a less popular, but more specific phrase  like ‘How to write a press release for your small business’ or ‘How to write a press release for a charity’ (generally referred to as ‘longtail’ keywords)  is likely to be more effective when it comes to Google rankings.

If you’re not sure how to make your topic more specific, using Google’s autocomplete is a fantastic hack. Start typing in your topic title and take note of the suggestions that come up under the search box — that’ll give you a great idea of the kinds of things that people are searching for relating to that subject. You can apply the same trick to Youtube and Pinterest too.

Other keyword hacks

If Google autocomplete isn’t giving you what you want you could try looking for inspiration in your industry’s trade publications. You could also head over to Amazon and look at books relating to your industry (chapter titles can be a great source of topic keywords), or have a quick look at your competitors’ sites for inspiration too.

Keyword tools

Keywords Everywhere — Type in your chosen phrase and this nifty tool will tell you how many people are searching for that particular phrase so you can determine whether it’s going to be too popular a search term.

Answer The Public — Key in your topic and you’ll find a list of related questions that people are asking about that particular subject.

Google Ads — Enter your keyword and let the price be your guide: the higher cost per click, the more popular the search term is likely to be.

Keyword Finder — This tool gives you really in depth information on how easy it’ll be to rank for your chosen phrase and shows you the top 10 pages ranking for that term. It even gives you some alternative suggestions, again showing you the popularity of each phrase.

Break down your content into awareness, consideration and purchase content

You may have heard me speak about the three main types of content before but it’s so important it’s worth mentioning again for anyone who missed it.  Dan Knowlton originally taught this so brilliantly at my event last year, Content Live.

  1. Awareness content: this content relates to your area of expertise and general information about the type of products you sell — so for my client Jennifer Hamley, who designs handbags, an example might be: How to protect an expensive handbag in the rain.  Or for my Media Diary: How to create a content calendar in six easy steps
  2. Consideration content: this is where you get a bit more specific about your product or service to help people decide whether to buy. For Jennifer, this is where she looks at how previous customers are using the specific features of one of the bags she sells, showing potential customers its many benefits: Eight ways to carry your cross-body handbag. And for my Media Diary: Have you got a 2019 content calendar for your blog? (How the 2019 Media Diary can help in just a few hours of using it)
  3. Purchase content: this is the straight up selling part — where Jennifer might do a live sales event on Facebook, for example.  I have also done a Facebook Live to sell the Media Diary or an Open Day to sell the Love Marketing Membership.

Most people are great at creating awareness content but fall down when it comes to the other two categories - often because they believe that it’ll come across as too ‘salesy’.

I find though, that lots of my new clients come to me directly as a result of my consideration or purchase content. And when you think about yourself as buyer, isn’t that the kind of content that makes you feel more confident about your purchasing decisions? You appreciate consideration and purchase content — and so do your customers.

When planning for the three content types, it’s all about hitting the right ratio. I’d generally go with about two to three ideas for each content type every time you launch a new product or service to make sure you’re not missing out on sales opportunities.

Podcast show notes:

  • Why you need to write blog posts that answer your clients or customer’s problems (6:03)
  • How to tailor your blog posts towards a paid product or service (12:54)
  • How to use keywords that will help you rank higher on Google (18:36)
  • Examples of the three different types of content you need to be creating (35:45)

Resources

Keywords Everywhere

GoogleAds

Answer the Public

KW Finder

Jennifer Hamley

Jammy Digital

Apply for a place on the LinkedIn Content Strategy Masterclass here

Get your hands on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course now

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn

 

[330] How to write awesome sales copy for your business

Do you struggle to write sales copy for your business?

In this  podcast episode I share practical tactics for writing sales copy in your business including sales pages, marketing emails, Facebook ads and more. And I share the frameworks I use in my own business to help me write awesome sales copy - and do it fast.

{Click on the player above to listen to the podcast episode and/or read on for a detailed overview. Scroll down to the bottom to read the show notes}.

Here’s an overview of what I cover in the episode:

I spent 18 years writing and editing for national newspapers like the Guardian. I’ve also helped hundreds of business owners with copywriting. And if there’s one thing I’ve learned it’s this: if you’re struggling to write sales copy for your business, it’s not because you’re a bad writer and/or don’t have any ideas. It’s simply that you don’t know what you want to say and/or have a structure or framework to follow. With that in mind here’s five practical tips and tactics to help you write more effective copy in 2019 and beyond. 

1.Focus on the problem your product/service solves for your customer

Before you even think about writing sales copy for a product or service, you need to understand the problem you’re solving for your prospective customers or clients. You need to be able to articulate that pain point - and show how you can heal that pain.

This means you need to get specific. Let’s say you’re a Facebook ads specialist, for example. Saying that you have an online course for small business owners who are fed up wasting money on ads that don’t work or specifically for business owners with online membership communities is far more likely to resonate with potential customers than simply saying you have a course on Facebook ads for small business owners.

It can be scary to niche down on a very specific type of customer/client - or hone in on a very specific pain point - but if you try to appeal to everyone, you’ll end up appealing to no one.

2. Create a ‘core offer’

For every new product/service I launch I write a ‘core offer’ - around 200 words of sales copy that sets out exactly what I’m selling and who I’m selling it to. I use this core offer as the basis of all my ad copy e.g. email marketing, Facebook ads, sales pages, social media posts and more. This saves me hours of time as can literally just cut and paste the words  into different types of sales copy.

You can hear me teaching my four-step sales formula to one of my clients in this podcast episode: On-air coaching: how to write awesome sales copy. 

My sales formula, along with a tutorial on how to use it, is also available as part of my how to write awesome sales copy course (which also includes templates, cheat sheets and swipe files for email marketing, sales pages, Facebook ads and more).

Get my how to write awesome sales copy course.

3. Focus on benefits not features

People don’t buy your product or service because they want a ‘thing’. They buy because they want the transformation that comes with having that ‘thing.’

For example, people don’t buy my how to write awesome sales copy course because they want a bunch of video tutorials, templates and swipe files. They buy it because they want the transformation that comes with the course: becoming the kind of person who can simply open a word or Google doc and write great copy (without spending hours sweating over their keyboard).

And they don’t buy high-end handbags because they want a bag. Yes they need something to carry their belongings in, but why spend £500 when a £10 bag would do the job? They buy the £500 bag because they want the transformation that comes with having the bag. For some people that might be about feeling fashionable and stylish (because that makes them feel good). For others that might be about showing off to other people that they have money.

Whatever you think of their motivations, it’s important you understand that peoples’ buying decisions are driven by emotion. Which is why simply listing the features of your product or service in your sales copy will leave them cold. Focus on the transformation your product or service can offer and you’re much more likely to grab peoples' attention.

4. Create or follow a framework

If you’re struggling to write sales copy, it’s not because you’re not a good writer, it’s because you don’t know what you want to say. And without a plan or a structure to follow the task of writing a sales page, Facebook ad or an email marketing campaign can seem too overwhelming.

This is why I’ve created frameworks for all the sales copy I create in my business. For example, when I’m writing Facebook ads, I generally create around 12 ads for each campaign (so I can test out different combinations of copy and images to see what resonates with my audience).

Sitting down to write 12 ads (around 3600 words) could be quite a daunting task, But because I’ve created frameworks I can follow to write Facebook ads, I can write each one in around five minutes.

Here's how I do it.

I create three styles of ad for each campaign: aspirational, painful and playful (I generally do 3-4 of each) - most of which are built around my 200 word ‘core offer’ (I explain what this is in point 2). This means all I have to do is switch the opening sentence or two in each version of the ad to create a new one.  As a result, I can generally write copy for 12 ads in around 90 mins. Without that framework I think it could take all day.

You can get access to my Facebook ad writing formula in my how to write awesome sales copy course.

I have similar frameworks I follow for writing email marketing campaigns, events sales pages, social media posts, online course sales pages & more - all of which are also available in the course. 

Learn what's working on Facebook right now. 

5. Be conversational

If you want to engage your ideal customers/clients in your sales copy, they need to feel as if you’re talking just to them. That’s why it’s important to use a relaxed, conversational style, personal pronouns (i.e. ‘you’ and ‘you’re’) and use simple, accessible language. If you imagine you’re writing a post on your personal Facebook page or a letter to a friend, you should have it about right.

Want to stop stressing over your sales copy? Get my how How To Write Awesome Sales Copy course. 

Podcast shownotes

Here’s what you’ll learn in this episode:

  • How to access all the resources referenced in this podcast (3:45)
  • Why you need to understand the particular pain point your customer has (8:35)
  • How to nail your ‘core offer’ (15:42)
  • Why you need to focus on the transformation your customer will receive/experience
  • How to understand the particular pain point your customer has (if you are a product based business) (23:15)
  • Why you need to use writing frameworks to help you create your copy quickly (32:07)
  • The three different types of ad copy I write (32:10)
  • The three different types of email copy I use (35:22)
  • Why you need to get conversational with your sales copy (39:02)
  • Examples of ad copy that works (40:41)

Resources

Book your place on the ‘How to write awesome sales copy’ course here 

Jennifer Hamley’s Website

Episode 325: Three social media posts that will help you generate sales today

Janet Murray’s Audience Calculator

Janet Murray’s Facebook Page

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook

[326] The one thing you need to generate passive income for your business

Do you want to generate passive income for your business in 2019?  Listen to this podcast to find out the one thing you should be doing to help achieve this goal, including some practical advice on the ‘magic numbers’ you need to know to help you reach your sales targets.

Here’s what you’ll learn in this episode:

  • Why the sales of my Media Diary made me scrap my content plan this week and record this podcast! (3:20)
  • Why passive income requires a lot of work upfront (6:04)
  • Why building an audience is essential before you consider creating passive income streams (7:55)
  • Why everyone’s audience ‘magic number’ will be different (and why you need to be realistic) (15:20)
  • Why you need to take action in 2019 (and not sit back and watch your competitors overtake you) (23:26)

Resources

Register your interest in the Build Your Audience Mastermind programme

Order the 2019 Sorted Content Planning Toolkit here

Order the 2019 Media Diary

Order the 2019 Media Diary and Media Diary Owners’ Club

Order the 2019 Wall Year Planner

Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Membership

Love Marketing, Make Money Income Goals Checklist

The Janet Murray Show Podcast Guide

My YouTube channel

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional

Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

My FREE Janet Murray’s Love Marketing Facebook Community

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook