twitter

[214] How to get more engagement on Twitter

Social media is all about engagement, but if you’re new to Twitter - or looking to up your game on the platform - you might be wondering how to get those conversations started.

In this episode, I’ll share my tips on how to get more engagement on Twitter and talk to prospective clients for your business.

Here’s what you’ll learn in this episode:

  • Tips on getting involved in Twitter chats - or even start your own
  • How to make use of pictures and videos on Twitter
  • Advice on how often to tweet - and it’s probably a lot more than you think

Key resources

Order the 2018 media diary or join the media diary owners’ club

The Soulful PR Studio

Video of Soulful PR Live

Soulful PR for Starters

A PDF guide to navigating the podcast episodes

The new speaking page on my website

Podcast How to grow your following on Twitter with Mika Kawula (episode 133)

Podcast How to get more engagement on your Facebook page (episode 192)

Podcast How to get more engagement in your Facebook group (episode 194)

Podcast How to get more engagement on Instagram (episode 196)

Podcast How to get more engagement on LinkedIn (episode 198)

Podcast How to use Instagram to promote your business with Sara Tasker (episode 93)

Podcast How to use Twitter chats to promote your business with Sian Conway (episode 151)

Blog post How to take part in a Twitter chat (and why it’s good PR for your business)

Soulful PR Podcast Community on Facebook: chat about the show with Janet and other listeners

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

My FREE Soulful PR Facebook Community: tips & advice for promoting your business

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook

What to do next

If you enjoyed today’s show, please share it using the social media buttons at the top of this page.

I’d also love it if you could take a few minutes to  leave an honest review and rating for the podcast on iTunes. I read every one personally and may even read yours out on the show.

And don’t forget to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, to get automatic updates every time a new episode goes live.

 

If there is something you really want to invest in for your business but think you can’t afford it, just tackling it from a different angle can really help you get what you want.

 

In this episode, I’ll be sharing why asking yourself ‘how can I make that affordable?’ will inspire you to start thinking differently about what you want for your business.

 

Here’s what you’ll learn in this episode:

 

  • My tips on where to look for cash when there’s something you want to invest in
  • Why you shouldn’t be afraid to ask other people to pay for training courses
  • Practical ways you can package up your products to offer something new to clients - and bring in more revenue

 

Key resources

 

Order the 2018 media diary or join the media diary owners’ club

 

The Soulful PR Studio

 

Your Year in PR - my media planning masterclass

Video of Soulful PR Live

Soulful PR for Starters

A PDF guide to navigating the podcast episodes

The new speaking page on my website

Katie Sykes’ first Facebook Live, which she used to make money to pay for a media diary

Podcast The one marketing question you should be asking yourself (but probably aren’t) (episode 210)

Podcast How to get new customers or clients (episode 206)

Podcast How to build an audience online with Lucy Parsons (episode 147)

Blog on how to afford an event

 

Soulful PR Podcast Community on Facebook: chat about the show with Janet and other listeners

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

My FREE Soulful PR Facebook Community: tips & advice for promoting your business

 

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook

 

What to do next

If you enjoyed today’s show, please share it using the social media buttons at the top of this page.

I’d also love it if you could take a few minutes to  leave an honest review and rating for the podcast on iTunes. I read every one personally and may even read yours out on the show.

And don’t forget to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, to get automatic updates every time a new episode goes live.

 

How to use social media to stand out at a live event

Live events can be busy and you may not get the chance to speak to every single person you’d like to on the day. Engaging on social media - before, during and after the event - not only helps you connect with more people. It can also make you more memorable to speakers and other guests.

With that in mind, here’s some advice on how to use social media to stand out at a live event.

1.Follow and use the event hashtag

Most live events have a dedicated hashtag - which groups together content on the same topic - that is promoted well in advance. Don’t wait until you get to the event; jump in early and start using it now. The event hashtag for #2020 Sorted is simply #2020Sorted.

Using the hashtag will help you ‘meet’ people ahead of the event - which will make it much easier for you to strike up a conversation when you meet them IRL (in real life).

You can use a scheduling tool like Buffer, Meet Edgar or SmarterQueue to schedule social media updates in advance. Don’t forget to include the event hashtag in your updates.

And don’t be afraid to share your updates more than once  – particularly on a platform like Twitter where content is scrolling through so fast, it’s easy for your followers to miss something (Meet Edgar and SmarterQueue have a ‘library’ function which will ‘requeue’ content for you as long as you vary the copy slightly). If you think you’re sharing too much, you’ve probably got it about right.

2. Use branded artwork provided by the event organisers

Many event organisers now provide branded artwork for you to use at the event. This can be a great way to connect with other delegates/speakers - and prospective clients. Showing that you're willing to invest in your personal and professional development can be attractive to people who might want to work with you in the future.

3.Follow Twitter lists

Most event organisers create a Twitter list of event guests. The #2020 Sorted Twitter list is here. Following the lists (or creating your own if there isn’t one) is a great way to start putting yourself out there and connecting with other guests ahead of the event.

If you do create a Twitter List, make sure that you make the list public. This will help you attract new followers - including those who aren’t attending the event. Taking the initiative to create the list will make you memorable to other guests.

4.Write a preview article

Writing a preview blog post that sets out your intentions for the event and sharing it on your social media networks (remembering to use the event hashtag of course!) can be a great way to introduce yourself in a memorable way - before you even get to the event. This is what lifestyle blogger Emma Tustian does in her preview of Blogtacular - I particularly like the format of her introduction.

If you’d like to write a preview piece for #2020 Sorted the hashtag is: #2020Sorted.

5.Get active in online groups

Most live event organisers create some kind of online community so delegates can connect before, during and after the event (#2020 Sorted has a dedicated Facebook community). Spending some time engaging in the online group, ahead of the event, will make it much easier to connect with people IRL.

People share really useful information in the group, as Jon Clayton has done here, letting people know about the great hotel deal he got at the Hilton for #2020 Sorted. 

6.Sit at the front of the room

Sitting at the front of the room (or as near as you can get) allows you to take much better photos, which increases the chances of your images being shared on social media.

It will also help you get eye contact with the speakers - which will make it much easier to connect with them afterwards.

7.Be socially active

The excitement around a live event starts to build well before the doors open. So don’t be afraid to post updates about your journey, pre-event drinks or anything else that will help you make a connection with other guests (and speakers) ahead of the event, using the dedicated hashtag.

If you’re worried about what to post during the event, here’s a list of ideas:

  • Juicy quotes or soundbites from speakers (if you really want to get noticed, you can add giphys or use an app like Ripl to turn your soundbites into short animated videos and image quotes)
  • Pictures or short videos of the speakers (with video it’s usually best to get permission from the event organiser first)
  • Selfies of you with the speakers and/or other delegates
  • Pictures/video clips of the food

  • Pictures/video clips of the goody bags (including the contents)
  • Pictures/video clips of the event programme and other ‘stationery’ items (my funky feedback cards get a lot of shares on social media, for example)

Tagging other guests - and speakers - into your social media updates, retweeting and re-sharing other people’s content and engaging with conversations going on around the event will mean your avatar keeps popping up - making you more memorable to other delegates (particularly if tweets are being displayed on a big screen). It can also help you connect with other guests (‘I liked your tweet about x’ can be a great conversation starter).

8. Use the event hashtag

Don’t forget to use the event hashtag on every update you post (and to find other people's posts). Remember also that some of the people following the hashtag may not actually be at the event - so bear that in mind when you’re writing captions/updates.

Using an app that allows you to create different streams for the conversation (e.g. mentions, replies) will make it much easier to follow.

If you have a Hootsuite account you can create a stream for the hashtag  you want to follow.  Tweetdeck allows you to do the same.

If you’d like to start posting about #2020 Sorted the hashtag is just: #2020Sorted.

9.Create visual content

Take loads of photographs and short videos with the people you meet (30 seconds or less for Twitter and Instagram). This is a great way to be remembered by the people you’ve connected with (especially if you tag them into your posts) as they will remain on your social media account forever.

10.Create live video content

Creating live content before, during or after the event can be a great way to stand out from the crowd. Facebook is generally the easiest way - as you can broadcast straight from your phone - but do check with the event organisers what their rules are on this (you’ll generally need permission to broadcast the presenters live).  Going live during the breaks can be just as much fun anyway. Here are some tips on improving your Facebook Live broadcasts.

Make sure you add captions to any videos you post on social media. You might find this blog useful: How to add captions to your videos using Rev and Kapwing.

11.Follow up

Attending live events can be tiring. When you get home - or back to your hotel room - you’ll probably just feel like putting your feet up and ordering a pizza. But taking the time to follow up with people you’ve connected with at the event will make you stand out.

Recording a short video/audio message and sending it over via Twitter or Facebook messenger can be a quick way to do this.

If you want to make more of an impact, you could also create a blog/vlog about your experience of attending the event.  Here’s how to write a blog post about an event you’ve attended.

And don’t forget to head over Facebook and Instagram to tag yourself into any photos that have been posted by the event organisers.

The Facebook page you’ll need for #2020 Sorted is here.

You can connect with me on Twitter here and on Instagram here.

Looking forward to seeing you at #2020 Sorted. If you haven't booked your ticket yet you can do that here. If you can’t attend the event, you can follow along on the hashtag #2020Sorted.

How to write a blog post about an event you've attended

If you’re attending a live event, creating a blog/vlog about your experience, can be a great way help you reflect on your experience and share what you’ve learned with your own audience.

But how do you put together a follow-up blog post? What should it include? How long should it be? And how can you make sure it's widely read and shared?

Read on and find out:

1. Plan your content

The best time to start working a follow up blog post is before you get to the event. Look at some some examples of post-event blog/vlogs. What do you like about the way the content is organised? How have they used different types of content e.g. written, visual, video?

Think about how you’re going to structure the content. Are you going to write a straight ‘review’ of each session as John Espirian did in this fab write up about You Are The Media 19 - in which case, plan to get pictures of all the speakers (ideally with you in them). You might prefer to write a more general review of the event as a whole as Jo-Anna Francis does in her blog - what's it's like to be on the other side - about ATOMICON 19.  You may even decide to write a preview piece setting out your intentions for the event, like lifestyle and craft blogger Eleanor Rae-Nickerson Smith’s preview of Blogtacular 2017 (in this case, you could write a follow-up post on how the event delivered on your expectations, as Eleanor does with her biggest Blogtacular takeaways). 

Decide if you’re going to create written, video or audio content - or a mix of all three (the latter is generally the most effective). But don’t stress about it; do what you can in the time you have available. If you’re planning to create a written blog post, a minimum of 1000 words is best for SEO.

Remember none of this is set in stone - you may well change your mind when you get to the event and that’s fine. But starting out with an idea of how you want to cover the event, will ensure you have the right kind of images, audio and video clips, should you need them.

2. Make sure you have all the kit you need.

A smartphone with a decent camera is all you need, but if you want to go more ‘pro’ you might consider taking additional lenses to get a greater variety of shots and/or lighting.

Recommendations:

Olliclip 4-in-1 lens for iphone

Gorillapod stand for smartphones

Lume Cube and Lume Cube Phone Mount for additional lighting for smartphones

If you have a digital recorder you might like to grab some audio comments from attendees and speakers. If you don’t have one, download an app like Voice Recorder (iPhones) or Smart Voice Recorder (Android) to your phone.

3. Gather images for your post

Make a list of all the pictures you think you might need to take during the event. This might include:

  • Pictures of all the speakers/event organiser
  • Selfies with the speakers and/or event organiser
  • Pictures of the inside and outside of the venue
  • Pictures of the event workbook/programme
  • Pictures of the food and/or goodie bags (if there are any)
  • Pictures from the evening socials (if there are any)

Asking the event organisers for the event artwork ahead of the event is also a good idea. For delegates that attend my live events we create a shared folder which includes the event logo, promotional artwork and pictures of speakers (although it’s better to get your own speaker pics, on the day, if you can). We add extra images to the folder in the run up to the event and on the day.

During the event, participate in the social media activity as much as you can and screenshot interesting tweets, Facebook or Instagram posts you think might be useful for your follow-up post.

4. Schedule time to create your follow-up post

Attending a live event is inspiring. You’ll leave feeling refreshed, motivated and ready for new challenges. But when you get back to your desk, you’ll undoubtedly be busy catching up from your time away from the office. That’s why it’s important to schedule time to create your follow-up post - before you get there - otherwise it may not happen.

It’s much better to create a follow-up post when the event is fresh in your head, so it’s best to schedule this immediately after the event if you can. If you have a long train ride or plane journey to get home, you could even get started then.

6. Share, share and share again

Creating a follow-up blog post can be a great way to get more traffic - and traffic can turn into sales (freelance technical writer John Espirian picked up a client almost straight away from his review of CMA Live 2017).

So don’t be afraid to promote the hell out of your blog post. Here are some places you can/should share your blog post.

  1. On all your relevant social media platforms, using the event hashtag. #2020 Sorted’s is: #2020Sorted. Remember to tag in the speakers, event organisers and other delegates wherever relevant
  2. In any relevant online communities (#2020 Sorted has a dedicated Facebook group, for example, which includes the delegates AND the speakers)
  3. With your email list (if you have one). Just remember to make it clear what’s in it for them
  4. On your podcast or YouTube channel (if you have one)
  5. On a Facebook Live broadcast
  6. With the event organiser. There’s a good chance they’ll be creating their own post-event round up and will be keen to include yours. 

Finally, don’t be afraid to share your content more than once  - particularly on a platform like Twitter where content is scrolling through to so fast, it’s easy for your followers to miss something. And it’s fine to share it on a consecutive number of days and weeks. If you think you’re sharing too much, you’ve probably got it about right.

Want to find out more? Here's why it's a good idea to blog about your event experience...

 

5 reasons to blog about attending a live event

If you’re attending a live event, there’s a good chance you’ll be taking photos, video and sharing your experience on social media.

Here’s five reasons why you should turn that content into a blog/vlog after the event.

1.It will help you process your learning

Attending a live event can be overwhelming. There is so much information coming from so many different sources, it’s easy to miss things. Taking time to reflect on the content is a great way to gather together all the practical advice and tips shared at the event. It can also help you identify key personal takeaways, as content marketing agency owner Yva Yorston did in her recent post on her key takeaways from CMA Live .

2. It will help you document your progress - and give you accountability

Taking a day or two out of your usual routine to attend a live event is good for you. You’ll leave on a high: refreshed, inspired and full of ideas. But when you get back to the desk - and the stresses of daily life - it’s easy to get bogged down and forget about all your exciting plans.

Reflecting on your experience and setting goals can be a great way to document your progress. It will also give you accountability. You’ve heard the saying ‘what gets written down gets done’ right?’ Stating publicly on your blog that you are going to take action  - as Kelly Exeter does in this blog on attending Tropical Think Tank - means it’s far more likely to get done.

Craft and lifestyle blogger Eleanor Rae-Nickerson Smith has taken this one step further. Last year she wrote about her experience of attending Blogtacular and set some goals for the coming year. She followed up with a preview of Blogtacular 2017, setting out her expectations for the event and will no doubt follow up with a review.

You could even turn your preview piece into a piece of valuable content for your audience as bespoke tailor Dara Ford has done ahead of Soulful PR Live: how to dress for a conference. 

The more you prepare for attending a live event - including setting out expectations for how you want to learn and grow - the more likely you are to get a return on investment.  

Blogtacular 2016
Setting expectations for what you want to learn at a live event can be invaluable

3. You can turn it into a valuable piece of content for your audience

When you attend a live event, you’ll undoubtedly pick up tips and strategies you can apply in your own business. You may also take away useful learning you can share with your clients or customers.

Karen Reyburn helps accountants with marketing. She has turned her recent experience of attending CMA Live into a blog post on why accountants should attend good marketing events. Katya Jackson - lifestyle blogger & iphone photographer - has turned her experience of attending Blogtacular into a post on the benefits of attending a conference for creatives. And when leadership consultant Coralie Sawruk attended  Tropical Think Tank, she turned her experience into a blog post: lessons from nine world-class entrepreneurs. The article identifies a key takeaway from each session e.g. ‘start with trust’ and ‘stop doing and start leading’ - a useful piece of content for anyone with an interest in leadership.

If you offer a product/service to other businesses (B2B) it’s usually easy to see how you can take your learning and turn into a valuable piece of content for your audience; a straightforward review of your time at the event can be useful.

If you sell to consumers (B2C) it can feel more challenging (but isn't - honestly!). The trick is to make it all about solving your prospective customers' problems or addressing their desires - just as you do in your regular blog posts.  

So potential titles might be:

  1. Three things we’ve improved about our customer service since attending X event
  2. Why we decided to offer [insert benefit e.g. free postage or shorter delivery times] to our customers after attending X event
  3. How attending X event helped us launch our new [insert new product]
  4. How attending X event made us realise we needed [insert new feature e.g. live chat on the website, shorter delivery times, a monthly newsletter, a loyalty scheme]
  5. Why we’re spending more time on Instagram/Facebook/Twitter* since attending X event

Remember that you don’t need to have implemented the changes in your follow-up blog post - you just need to set your intention. Your blog content can simply be a straight ‘review’ of what you’ve learned (as in many of the examples I’ve shared). The important thing is that you make it relevant to your audience.

Do also bear in mind the fact you’re investing time and money in attending live events sends a powerful message to prospective and existing customers: if you care about your personal and/or business development, you’ll care for them too.

4. You’ll get more traffic on your website (and some visitors will buy from you)

When you blog about your experience of attending an event, you’re creating an evergreen piece of content that can be shared on social media. It will also send people over to your website to find out more about you do - for years to come (just look at all the blogs I’ve linked to in this post). Freelance technical writer John Espirian says he’s already picked up a client from his review of CMA Live 2017  last month.

John Espirian has  picked up a client from his blog post about CMA Live 2017

5. You’ll build relationships

Live events can be busy and you may not get the chance to speak to every single person you’d like to at the event. Creating a piece of content about the event helps keep the conversation going with speakers, delegates and the organisers - long after the event has finished.

It also makes you more memorable. When you create a blog post about your experience of an event, it’s a big fat reminder to everyone who attended of who you are and what you do. Marketing expert Roger Edwards created this vlog about speaking at CMA Live because - amongst other things - he wants people to remember he is available for speaking engagements.

Remember also that event organisers will be keen to share your blog with their audience on social media and in any relevant online communities e.g. Facebook groups - getting your content in front of a bigger audience than you could hope for on your own blog.

Speakers will also be keen to share your content - particularly if they’re mentioned - which means you can tag them in on social media and, potentially, get your content in front of an even bigger audience.

When you create a blog post about your experience at an event, it reminds people who you are and what you do

Want to learn more? Find out which PR/marketing events you should attend in 2017. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to take part in a Twitter chat (and why it’s good PR for your business)

If you’re looking to build relationships with liked-minded business owners - and prospective customers - taking part in Twitter chats can be a good move.

But what exactly are Twitter chats, how do you find ones that are relevant to your business and how do you take part? Read on and find out.

What is a Twitter chat?

A Twitter chat is a public conversation that revolves around a unique hashtag  e.g. #contenthour (N.B. for the uninitiated, hashtags group together tweets on a similar topic). A Twitter chat can be ongoing, but more commonly are hosted at a regular time and/or day (e.g. once a week or month). Some people describe it as like networking in your pyjamas (or whatever you wear when you're hanging out at home).

If you don’t have an account already, you’ll need to sign up to Twitter to take part in a chat. Fill out your profile, add a picture, and start following some relevant accounts (Twitter will make suggestions) so you can get the hang of how it all works. Here are some tips for new users.

How do you find Twitter chats that are relevant to your business?

You can find regularly scheduled Twitter chats on The Chat Diary, Gnosis Arts, Twubs Chat Schedule or Tweet Reports.  Another way to find Twitter chats is to search for hashtags that interest you on a site like Hashtag.it or Hashtags.org.

Twitter chat

How do you take part in Twitter chats?

Most hosts publish the topic of the chat ahead of time - on their Twitter page (in a pinned tweet for example), on their website, a Facebook group or wherever they hang out online.

The chat host will generally welcome participants, pose questions and keep the conversation moving along. Sometimes a guest host will be appointed to post and/or answer questions.

When you join the chat, take a moment to identify the host, the hashtag and any questions being posted. You may then want to introduce yourself.

The #contenthour chat is typical in that it centres around four to six questions, posted like this:

Q1: How much time to do you spend on content marketing activities each week? #contenthour

Q2: Which tool or app do you find most useful for promoting your business? #contenthour

If you can respond like this (referencing the questions you are answering in your answer)  it makes it much easier for everyone to follow the conversation.

A1: Around 7 hours #contenthour

A2: I love Meet Edgar for social media scheduling #contenthour

Getting the most out of Twitter chats

If you ask a question or respond to someone in the chat, use the hashtag so everyone can be in on the conversation.

Retweeting the posts of another user in the chat is a great way to build relationships. It’s fine to share tweets from within the chat with your followers - by retweeting and/or adding your own comments - but don’t forget to use the hashtag so people can follow along.

Sharing relevant articles, infographics and videos can be a great way to add value to the discussion. You may even want to create specific content e.g. blog posts to share during the chat. Just make sure the focus is always on adding value; if people sense you’re just there to sell, they’ll soon switch off.

It’s fine to tweet people privately during the chat - just don’t include the hashtag.

The more activity on the hashtag during the Twitter chat, the more likely it is to trend on Twitter - which will help you connect with even more relevant people.

Apps for following the chat

Using an app that allows you to create different streams for the Twitter chat (e.g. mentions, replies will make it much easier to follow the conversation.

If  you have a Hootsuite account you can create a stream for the hashtag  you want to follow.  Tweetdeck allows you to do the same.

For more tips, listen to: how to use Twitter chats to promote your business. 

Want to find out more?

Join my #contenthour weekly Twitter chat on Mondays 9pm (BST), 4pm (EDT) 1pm (PDT), for ideas and inspiration to promote and grow your business.

 

 

 

[151] How to use Twitter chats to promote your business with Sian Conway

If you’re looking to grow your following on Twitter, you might want to take part in Twitter chats - or even host your own.

In this episode, Sian Conway talks about how she launched the #EthicalHour Twitter chat which now gets around one million impressions a month - and has helped her build her profile, attract new clients and speaking opportunities.

Here’s what you’ll learn in this episode:

  • What a Twitter chat is and how to find existing chats that are relevant for your business
  • How starting your own Twitter chat can help you generate leads and sales
  • Tips on getting started, including the ideal time - and frequency - for a Twitter chat
  • Advice on spreading the word about a new Twitter chat and getting people get involved
  • How to use expert Q&As and guest hosts within a Twitter chat
  • Tips on using tools such as Storify to collate your chat content - and encourage further shares
  • Monetisation: how to generate income from your Twitter
  • How the #EthicalHour Twitter chat has created media opportunities for Sian and others

Key resources

The Soulful PR Studio

ResponseSource

Sian Conway’s Facebook group

Ethical Hour on Twitter

Sian’s Twitter account

Podcast How to grow your following on Twitter with Mike Kawula (episode 133)

Podcast How to use Instagram to grow your business with Sara Tasker (episode 93)

**MY BOOK ** Your Press Release Is Breaking My Heart (A Totally Unconventional Guide To Selling Your Story In The Media)

My FREE Soulful PR Facebook Community

Connect with me on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook

What to do next

If you enjoyed today’s show, please share it using the social media buttons at the top of this page.

I’d also love it if you could take a few minutes to  leave an honest review and rating for the podcast on iTunes. I read every one personally and may even read yours out on the show.

And don’t forget to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, to get automatic updates every time a new episode goes live.